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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:徐建国 大小:c2cqXU8f65764KB 下载:I4snlqtq88378次
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日期:2020-08-07 21:28:29
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Thus then were they shut up squealing, and Circe threw them someacorns and beech masts such as pigs eat, but Eurylochus hurried backto tell me about the sad fate of our comrades. He was so overcome withdismay that though he tried to speak he could find no words to doso; his eyes filled with tears and he could only sob and sigh, till atlast we forced his story out of him, and he told us what hadhappened to the others.
2.  On this the day broke, but Ulysses heard the sound of her weeping,and it puzzled him, for it seemed as though she already knew him andwas by his side. Then he gathered up the cloak and the fleeces onwhich he had lain, and set them on a seat in the cloister, but he tookthe bullock's hide out into the open. He lifted up his hands toheaven, and prayed, saying "Father Jove, since you have seen fit tobring me over land and sea to my own home after all the afflictionsyou have laid upon me, give me a sign out of the mouth of some oneor other of those who are now waking within the house, and let me haveanother sign of some kind from outside."
3.  "Meanwhile Menelaus and I were on our way home from Troy, on goodterms with one another. When we got to Sunium, which is the point ofAthens, Apollo with his painless shafts killed Phrontis thesteersman of Menelaus' ship (and never man knew better how to handle avessel in rough weather) so that he died then and there with thehelm in his hand, and Menelaus, though very anxious to pressforward, had to wait in order to bury his comrade and give him his duefuneral rites. Presently, when he too could put to sea again, andhad sailed on as far as the Malean heads, Jove counselled evil againsthim and made it it blow hard till the waves ran mountains high. Herehe divided his fleet and took the one half towards Crete where theCydonians dwell round about the waters of the river Iardanus. There isa high headland hereabouts stretching out into the sea from a placecalled Gortyn, and all along this part of the coast as far as Phaestusthe sea runs high when there is a south wind blowing, but arterPhaestus the coast is more protected, for a small headland can makea great shelter. Here this part of the fleet was driven on to therocks and wrecked; but the crews just managed to save themselves. Asfor the other five ships, they were taken by winds and seas toEgypt, where Menelaus gathered much gold and substance among people ofan alien speech. Meanwhile Aegisthus here at home plotted his evildeed. For seven years after he had killed Agamemnon he ruled inMycene, and the people were obedient under him, but in the eighth yearOrestes came back from Athens to be his bane, and killed themurderer of his father. Then he celebrated the funeral rites of hismother and of false Aegisthus by a banquet to the people of Argos, andon that very day Menelaus came home, with as much treasure as hisships could carry.
4.  "I am very much distressed," said Telemachus, "by what you have justtold me. How can I take this stranger into my house? I am as yetyoung, and am not strong enough to hold my own if any man attacksme. My mother cannot make up her mind whether to stay where she is andlook after the house out of respect for public opinion and thememory of her husband, or whether the time is now come for her to takethe best man of those who are wooing her, and the one who will makeher the most advantageous offer; still, as the stranger has come toyour station I will find him a cloak and shirt of good wear, with asword and sandals, and will send him wherever he wants to go. Or ifyou like you can keep him here at the station, and I will send himclothes and food that he may be no burden on you and on your men;but I will not have him go near the suitors, for they are veryinsolent, and are sure to ill-treat him in a way that would greatlygrieve me; no matter how valiant a man may be he can do nothingagainst numbers, for they will be too strong for him."
5.  While he was thus in two minds a wave caught him and took him withsuch force against the rocks that he would have been smashed andtorn to pieces if Minerva had not shown him what to do. He caught holdof the rock with both hands and clung to it groaning with pain tillthe wave retired, so he was saved that time; but presently the wavecame on again and carried him back with it far into the sea-tearinghis hands as the suckers of a polypus are torn when some one plucks itfrom its bed, and the stones come up along with it even so did therocks tear the skin from his strong hands, and then the wave drewhim deep down under the water.
6.  "When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, we admiredthe island and wandered all over it, while the nymphs Jove's daughtersroused the wild goats that we might get some meat for our dinner. Onthis we fetched our spears and bows and arrows from the ships, anddividing ourselves into three bands began to shoot the goats. Heavensent us excellent sport; I had twelve ships with me, and each ship gotnine goats, while my own ship had ten; thus through the livelong dayto the going down of the sun we ate and drank our fill,- and we hadplenty of wine left, for each one of us had taken many jars fullwhen we sacked the city of the Cicons, and this had not yet run out.While we were feasting we kept turning our eyes towards the land ofthe Cyclopes, which was hard by, and saw the smoke of their stubblefires. We could almost fancy we heard their voices and the bleating oftheir sheep and goats, but when the sun went down and it came on dark,we camped down upon the beach, and next morning I called a council.

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1.  This was what they said, but they did not know what it was thathad been happening. The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointedUlysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minervamade him look taller and stronger than before; she also made thehair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders justas a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcanor Minerva- and his work is full of beauty- enriches a piece of silverplate by gilding it. He came from the bath looking like one of theimmortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left. "Mydear," said he, "heaven has endowed you with a heart more unyieldingthan woman ever yet had. No other woman could bear to keep away fromher husband when he had come back to her after twenty years ofabsence, and after having gone through so much. But come, nurse, get abed ready for me; I will sleep alone, for this woman has a heart ashard as iron."
2.  Then Jove's daughter Minerva came up to them, having assumed theform and voice of Mentor. Ulysses was glad when he saw her, and saidto his son Telemachus, "Telemachus, now that are about to fight inan engagement, which will show every man's mettle, be sure not todisgrace your ancestors, who were eminent for their strength andcourage all the world over."
3.  "The men when they got on shore followed a level road by which thepeople draw their firewood from the mountains into the town, tillpresently they met a young woman who had come outside to fetchwater, and who was daughter to a Laestrygonian named Antiphates. Shewas going to the fountain Artacia from which the people bring in theirwater, and when my men had come close up to her, they asked her whothe king of that country might be, and over what kind of people heruled; so she directed them to her father's house, but when they gotthere they found his wife to be a giantess as huge as a mountain,and they were horrified at the sight of her.
4.  As he spoke he picked up a heifer's foot from the meat-basket inwhich it lay, and threw it at Ulysses, but Ulysses turned his head alittle aside, and avoided it, smiling grimly Sardinian fashion as hedid so, and it hit the wall, not him. On this Telemachus spokefiercely to Ctesippus, "It is a good thing for you," said he, "thatthe stranger turned his head so that you missed him. If you had hithim I should have run you through with my spear, and your father wouldhave had to see about getting you buried rather than married in thishouse. So let me have no more unseemly behaviour from any of you,for I am grown up now to the knowledge of good and evil and understandwhat is going on, instead of being the child that I have beenheretofore. I have long seen you killing my sheep and making free withmy corn and wine: I have put up with this, for one man is no match formany, but do me no further violence. Still, if you wish to kill me,kill me; I would far rather die than see such disgraceful scenes dayafter day- guests insulted, and men dragging the women servantsabout the house in an unseemly way."
5.  "'You will now come to the Thrinacian island, and here you willsee many herds of cattle and flocks of sheep belonging to the sun-god-seven herds of cattle and seven flocks of sheep, with fifty head ineach flock. They do not breed, nor do they become fewer in number, andthey are tended by the goddesses Phaethusa and Lampetie, who arechildren of the sun-god Hyperion by Neaera. Their mother when shehad borne them and had done suckling them sent them to theThrinacian island, which was a long way off, to live there and lookafter their father's flocks and herds. If you leave these flocksunharmed, and think of nothing but getting home, you may yet aftermuch hardship reach Ithaca; but if you harm them, then I forewarnyou of the destruction both of your ship and of your comrades; andeven though you may yourself escape, you will return late, in badplight, after losing all your men.'
6.  Euryclea did as she was told, and bolted the women inside theirroom. Then Ulysses and his son made all haste to take the helmets,shields, and spears inside; and Minerva went before them with a goldlamp in her hand that shed a soft and brilliant radiance, whereonTelemachus said, "Father, my eyes behold a great marvel: the walls,with the rafters, crossbeams, and the supports on which they restare all aglow as with a flaming fire. Surely there is some god herewho has come down from heaven."

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1.  "'And I will tell you of all the wicked witchcraft that Circe willtry to practise upon you. She will mix a mess for you to drink, andshe will drug the meal with which she makes it, but she will not beable to charm you, for the virtue of the herb that I shall give youwill prevent her spells from working. I will tell you all about it.When Circe strikes you with her wand, draw your sword and springupon her as though you were goings to kill her. She will then befrightened and will desire you to go to bed with her; on this you mustnot point blank refuse her, for you want her to set your companionsfree, and to take good care also of yourself, but you make her swearsolemnly by all the blessed that she will plot no further mischiefagainst you, or else when she has got you naked she will unman you andmake you fit for nothing.'
2.  "King Apollo," answered Mercury, "I only wish I might get thechance, though there were three times as many chains- and you mightlook on, all of you, gods and goddesses, but would sleep with her if Icould."
3.  Minerva now made the suitors fall to laughing immoderately, andset their wits wandering; but they were laughing with a forcedlaughter. Their meat became smeared with blood; their eyes filled withtears, and their hearts were heavy with forebodings. Theoclymenussaw this and said, "Unhappy men, what is it that ails you? There isa shroud of darkness drawn over you from head to foot, your cheeks arewet with tears; the air is alive with wailing voices; the walls androof-beams drip blood; the gate of the cloisters and the courtbeyond them are full of ghosts trooping down into the night of hell;the sun is blotted out of heaven, and a blighting gloom is over allthe land."
4.  She then went quickly on, and Telemachus followed in her stepstill they reached the place where the guilds of the Pylian people wereassembled. There they found Nestor sitting with his sons, while hiscompany round him were busy getting dinner ready, and putting piecesof meat on to the spits while other pieces were cooking. When they sawthe strangers they crowded round them, took them by the hand andbade them take their places. Nestor's son Pisistratus at onceoffered his hand to each of them, and seated them on some softsheepskins that were lying on the sands near his father and hisbrother Thrasymedes. Then he gave them their portions of the inwardmeats and poured wine for them into a golden cup, handing it toMinerva first, and saluting her at the same time.
5.   On this the swineherd led the way into the hut and bade him sitdown. He strewed a good thick bed of rushes upon the floor, and on thetop of this he threw the shaggy chamois skin- a great thick one- onwhich he used to sleep by night. Ulysses was pleased at being madethus welcome, and said "May Jove, sir, and the rest of the godsgrant you your heart's desire in return for the kind way in whichyou have received me."
6.  Then he went downstairs again, leaving Penelope in an agony ofgrief. There were plenty of seats in the house, but she. had noheart for sitting on any one of them; she could only fling herselfon the floor of her own room and cry; whereon all the maids in thehouse, both old and young, gathered round her and began to cry too,till at last in a transport of sorrow she exclaimed,

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1.  "When I saw him I tried to pacify him and said, 'Ajax, will younot forget and forgive even in death, but must the judgement aboutthat hateful armour still rankle with you? It cost us Argives dearenough to lose such a tower of strength as you were to us. Wemourned you as much as we mourned Achilles son of Peleus himself,nor can the blame be laid on anything but on the spite which Jove boreagainst the Danaans, for it was this that made him counsel yourdestruction- come hither, therefore, bring your proud spirit intosubjection, and hear what I can tell you.'
2.  As he spoke he sat down, and Telemachus threw his arms about hisfather and wept. They were both so much moved that they cried aloudlike eagles or vultures with crooked talons that have been robbed oftheir half fledged young by peasants. Thus piteously did they weep,and the sun would have gone down upon their mourning if Telemachus hadnot suddenly said, "In what ship, my dear father, did your crewbring you to Ithaca? Of what nation did they declare themselves to be-for you cannot have come by land?"
3.  "Good heavens," said he, "see how the gods have saved this manfrom destruction. We kept a succession of scouts upon the headlandsall day long, and when the sun was down we never went on shore tosleep, but waited in the ship all night till morning in the hope ofcapturing and killing him; but some god has conveyed him home in spiteof us. Let us consider how we can make an end of him. He must notescape us; our affair is never likely to come off while is alive,for he is very shrewd, and public feeling is by no means all on ourside. We must make haste before he can call the Achaeans inassembly; he will lose no time in doing so, for he will be furiouswith us, and will tell all the world how we plotted to kill him, butfailed to take him. The people will not like this when they come toknow of it; we must see that they do us no hurt, nor drive us from ourown country into exile. Let us try and lay hold of him either on hisfarm away from the town, or on the road hither. Then we can divideup his property amongst us, and let his mother and the man who marriesher have the house. If this does not please you, and you wishTelemachus to live on and hold his father's property, then we must notgather here and eat up his goods in this way, but must make our offersto Penelope each from his own house, and she can marry the man whowill give the most for her, and whose lot it is to win her."
4、  SO HERE Ulysses slept, overcome by sleep and toil; but Minervawent off to the country and city of the Phaecians- a people who usedto live in the fair town of Hypereia, near the lawless Cyclopes. Nowthe Cyclopes were stronger than they and plundered them, so their kingNausithous moved them thence and settled them in Scheria, far from allother people. He surrounded the city with a wall, built houses andtemples, and divided the lands among his people; but he was dead andgone to the house of Hades, and King Alcinous, whose counsels wereinspired of heaven, was now reigning. To his house, then, didMinerva hie in furtherance of the return of Ulysses.
5、  "Those who have seen us both," answered Ulysses, "have always saidwe were wonderfully like each other, and now you have noticed it too.

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  • 梅里尔·爱德华·纽曼 08-06

      Telemachus answered boldly, for Minerva had given him courage to askabout his father and get himself a good name.

  • 骆警官 08-06

      "For six days my men kept driving in the best cows and feasting uponthem, but when Jove the son of Saturn had added a seventh day, thefury of the gale abated; we therefore went on board, raised our masts,spread sail, and put out to sea. As soon as we were well away from theisland, and could see nothing but sky and sea, the son of Saturnraised a black cloud over our ship, and the sea grew dark beneathit. We not get on much further, for in another moment we were caughtby a terrific squall from the West that snapped the forestays of themast so that it fell aft, while all the ship's gear tumbled about atthe bottom of the vessel. The mast fell upon the head of thehelmsman in the ship's stern, so that the bones of his head werecrushed to pieces, and he fell overboard as though he were diving,with no more life left in him.

  • 聂文强 08-06

       This was what he said, but all the time he was expecting to beable to string the bow and shoot through the iron, whereas in facthe was to be the first that should taste of the arrows from thehands of Ulysses, whom he was dishonouring in his own house- eggingthe others on to do so also.

  • 胡雷 08-06

      Thus spoke Antinous, but Telemachus heeded him not. Meanwhile theheralds were bringing the holy hecatomb through the city, and theAchaeans gathered under the shady grove of Apollo.

  • 蒋英胜 08-05

    {  "Stranger," said she, "rise and let us be going back to the town;I will introduce you at the house of my excellent father, where Ican tell you that you will meet all the best people among thePhaecians. But be sure and do as I bid you, for you seem to be asensible person. As long as we are going past the fields- and farmlands, follow briskly behind the waggon along with the maids and Iwill lead the way myself. Presently, however, we shall come to thetown, where you will find a high wall running all round it, and a goodharbour on either side with a narrow entrance into the city, and theships will be drawn up by the road side, for every one has a placewhere his own ship can lie. You will see the market place with atemple of Neptune in the middle of it, and paved with large stonesbedded in the earth. Here people deal in ship's gear of all kinds,such as cables and sails, and here, too, are the places where oars aremade, for the Phaeacians are not a nation of archers; they knownothing about bows and arrows, but are a sea-faring folk, and pridethemselves on their masts, oars, and ships, with which they travel farover the sea.

  • 严严 08-04

      "Firstly, then, I will tell you my name that you too may know it,and one day, if I outlive this time of sorrow, may become my thereguests though I live so far away from all of you. I am Ulysses sonof Laertes, reknowned among mankind for all manner of subtlety, sothat my fame ascends to heaven. I live in Ithaca, where there is ahigh mountain called Neritum, covered with forests; and not far fromit there is a group of islands very near to one another- Dulichium,Same, and the wooded island of Zacynthus. It lies squat on thehorizon, all highest up in the sea towards the sunset, while theothers lie away from it towards dawn. It is a rugged island, but itbreeds brave men, and my eyes know none that they better love tolook upon. The goddess Calypso kept me with her in her cave, andwanted me to marry her, as did also the cunning Aeaean goddessCirce; but they could neither of them persuade me, for there isnothing dearer to a man than his own country and his parents, andhowever splendid a home he may have in a foreign country, if it be farfrom father or mother, he does not care about it. Now, however, I willtell you of the many hazardous adventures which by Jove's will I metwith on my return from Troy.}

  • 王俊生 08-04

      Then Penelope sprang up from her couch, threw her arms roundEuryclea, and wept for joy. "But my dear nurse," said she, "explainthis to me; if he has really come home as you say, how did he manageto overcome the wicked suitors single handed, seeing what a numberof them there always were?"

  • 穆昆丹 08-04

      "Thus spoke Eurylochus, and the men approved his words. Now thecattle, so fair and goodly, were feeding not far from the ship; themen, therefore drove in the best of them, and they all stood roundthem saying their prayers, and using young oak-shoots instead ofbarley-meal, for there was no barley left. When they had donepraying they killed the cows and dressed their carcasses; they cut outthe thigh bones, wrapped them round in two layers of fat, and set somepieces of raw meat on top of them. They had no wine with which to makedrink-offerings over the sacrifice while it was cooking, so theykept pouring on a little water from time to time while the inwardmeats were being grilled; then, when the thigh bones were burned andthey had tasted the inward meats, they cut the rest up small and putthe pieces upon the spits.

  • 贾思勰 08-03

       Telemachus gave him no heed, but sat silently watching his father,expecting every moment that he would begin his attack upon thesuitors.

  • 榆林-西安-成都 08-01

    {  On this he broke up the assembly, and every man went back to his ownabode, while the suitors returned to the house of Ulysses.

  • 陶灵刚 08-01

      Penelope, who was sleeping sweetly at the gates of dreamland,answered, "Sister, why have you come here? You do not come very often,but I suppose that is because you live such a long way off. Am I,then, to leave off crying and refrain from all the sad thoughts thattorture me? I, who have lost my brave and lion-hearted husband, whohad every good quality under heaven, and whose name was great over allHellas and middle Argos; and now my darling son has gone off onboard of a ship- a foolish fellow who has never been used toroughing it, nor to going about among gatherings of men. I am evenmore anxious about him than about my husband; I am all in a tremblewhen I think of him, lest something should happen to him, eitherfrom the people among whom he has gone, or by sea, for he has manyenemies who are plotting against him, and are bent on killing himbefore he can return home."

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