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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:彭水根 大小:f25yqaTn95544KB 下载:mezZdFjA65597次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:EzXRwMsF13299条
日期:2020-08-04 04:49:46
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张壮

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Reniero swelling with discontentment, yet wisely clouding it fromopen apprehension, and knowing well enough, that such goldenspeeches and promises, did alwaies savour of what intemperatespleene would more lavishly have vented foorth, and therefore in amodest dissembling manner; without the least shew of any anger, thushe answered.
2.  Lambertuccio sware many terrible oathes, to observe her directionsin every part, and having drawne forth his Sword, grasping it naked inhis hand, and setting worse lookes on the businesse, then evernature gave him, because he had spent so much labour in vaine; hefailed not in a jot of the Ladies injunction. Beltramo havingcommanded his horse to safe custody, and meeting Lambertucciodiscending downe the staires, so armed, swearing, and mostextreamely storming, wondring extraordinarily at his threatning words,made offer to imbrace him., and understand the reason of hisdistemper. Lambertuccio repulsing him rudely, and setting foote in thestirrup, mounted on his Gelding, and spake nothing else but this. Isweare by the fairest of all my fortunes, although I misse of theeheere: yet I will be sure to find thee some where else, and so hegallopped mainely away.
3.  Having taken her sad and sorrowfull farewell of them all,accompanied onely with her Maide, and one of her Kinsmen, away shewent, attired in a Pilgrimes habit, yet well furnished with moneyand precious jewels, to avoyde all wants which might: befall her intravaile; not acquainting any one whether she went. In no place stayedshe, untill she was arrived at Florence, where happening into apoore Widdowes house, like a poore Pilgrime, she seemed well contentedtherewith. And desiring to heare some tydings of the Count, the nextday shee saw him passe by the house on horse-backe, with hiscompany. Now, albeit shee knew him well enough, yet shee demanded ofthe good old Widdow, what Gentleman he was? She made answer, that hewas a stranger there, yet a Nobleman, called Count Bertrand ofRoussillion, a very courteous Knight, beloved and much respected inthe City. Moreover, that he was farre in love with a neighbour ofhers, a young Gentlewoman, but very poore and meane in substance,yet of honest life, vertuous, and never taxed with any evill report:onely her poverty was the maine imbarment of her marriage, dwelling inhouse with her mother, who was a wise, honest, and worthy Lady.
4.  I would not have thee Mithridanes, to wonder at my counsel ordetermination; because, since age hath made mee Maister of mine ownewill, and I resolved to doe that, wherein thou hast begun to followme: never came any man to mee, whom I did not content (if I could)in any thing he demanded of me. It was thy fortune to come for mylife, which when I saw thee so desirous to have it, I resolvedimmediately to bestow it on thee: and so much the rather, because thoushouldst not be the onely man, that ever departed hence, withoutenjoying whatsoever hee demanded. And, to the end thou mightst themore assuredly have it, I gave thee that advice, least by not enjoyingmine, thou shouldest chance to loose thine owne. I have had the use ofit full fourescore yeares, with the consummation of all my delightsand pleasures: and well I know, that according to the course of Nature(as it fares with other men, and generally all things else) itcannot bee long before it must leave mee.
5.  Because I cannot once againe returne;
6.  Dioneus having thus ended his Novel, and the Ladies delivering theirseverall judgements, according to their owne fancies, some holding oneconceite, others leaning to the contrary; one blaming this thing,and another commending that, the King lifting his eyes to heaven,and seeing the Sun began to fal low, by rising of the EveningStarre; without arising from his seat, spake as followeth. DiscreetLadies, I am perswaded you know sufficiently, that the sense andunderstanding of us mortals, consisteth not onely (as I think) bypreserving in memory things past, or knowledge of them present; butsuch as both by the one and other, know how to foresee futureoccasions, are worthily thought wise, and of no common capacity.

计划指导

1.  The Count hearing this, stoode as confounded with admiration; forfull well he knew the Ring: and both the children were so perfectlylike him, as he was confirmed to be their Father by generalljudgement. Upon his urging by what possible meanes this could bebrought to passe: the Countesse in presence of the whole assembly, andunto her eternall commendation, related the whole history, even insuch manner as you have formerly heard it. Moreover, she reportedthe private speeches in bed, uttered betweene himselfe and her,being witnessed more apparantly, by the costly jewels there openlyshewne. All which infallible proofes, proclaiming his shame, and hermost noble carriage to her husband; he confessed, that she had toldnothing but the truth in every point which she had reported.
2.  To die for him, it is my sole desire,
3.  By this time, the kindred and friends to the dead man (uppon noiseof his death bruited abroad) were likewise come to the Pallace, yea,most of the men and women dwelling in the Cittie, the bodie ofGabriello being laide in the midst of the Court, upon the whiteDamaske shrowd given by Andreana, with infinite Roses and othersweet Flowers lying theron: and such was the peoples love to him, thatnever was any mans death, more to be bemoaned and lamented. Beingdelivered out of the Court, it was carried to buriall, not like aBurgesse or ordinary Citizen, but with such pompe as beseemed a LordBaron, and on the shoulders of very noble Gentlemen, with greathonor and reverence.
4.  Bernardo answered in this manner. I am a Merchant, and noPhilosopher, and like a Merchant I meane to answer thee. I am not tolearne, that these accidents by thee related, may happen to fooles,who are voide of understanding or shame: but such as are wise, andendued with vertue, have alwayes such a precious esteeme of theirhonour, that they wil containe those principles of constancie, whichmen are meerely carelesse of, and I justifie my wife to be one ofthem. Beleeve me Bernardo, replyed Ambroginolo, if so often as thywives minde is addicted to wanton folly, a badge of scorne shouldarise on thy forehead, to render testimony of hir female frailty, Ibeleeve the number of them would be more, then willingly you wouldwish them to be. And among all married men in every degree, thenotes are so secret of their wives imperfections, that the sharpestsight is not able to discerne them: and the wiser sort of men arewilling not to know them; because shame and losse of honour is neverimposed, but in cases evident and apparant.
5.  Now, whether feeding on salt meates before his coming thither, orcustomary use of drinking, which maketh men unable any long while toabstaine as being never satisfied with excesse; which of these twoextreames they were, I know not: but drinke needs he must. And, havingno other meanes for quenching his thirst, espied the glasse of waterstanding in the Window, and thinking it to be some soveraigne kinde ofwater, reserved by the Doctor for his owne drinking, to make him lustyin his old yeeres, he tooke the glasse; and finding the water pleasingto his pallate, dranke it off every drop; then sitting downe on aCoffer by the beds side, soone after he fell into a sound sleepe,according to the powerfull working of the water.
6.  The widdowed Gentlewoman, and all the rest in her company, beingbashfully ashamed of her owne and their folly, presently said.Master Albert, you have both well and worthily chastised our over-boldpresumption, and beleeve me Sir, I repute your love and kindnesse ofno meane merrit, comming from a man so wise and vertuous: Andtherefore (mine honour reserved) commaund my uttermost, as alwayesready to do you any honest service. Master Albert, arising from hisseat, thanking the faire widdow for her gentle offer; tooke leave ofher and all the company, and she blushing, as all the rest weretherein not much behinde her, thinking to checke him, became chiddenher selfe, whereby (if we be wise) let us all take warning.

推荐功能

1.  Madame Fiammetta, whose lockes of haire were curled, long, andlike golden wiers, hanging somewhat downe over her white anddelicate shoulders, her visage round, wherein the Damaske Rose andLilly contended for priority, the eyes in her head, resembling thoseof the Faulcon messenger, and a dainty mouth; her lippes lookinglike two little Rubyes, with a commendable smile thus she replyed.
2.  So I can thinke none true, none sure,
3.  MAY FALL OUT TO BEE, ESPECIALLY WHEN A MAN FINDS HIMSELFE
4.  THE EIGHT DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL
5.   MAY MAKE USE OF HIS ABSOLUTE POWER AND AUTHORITY, TOWARDS MAIDES
6.  There dwelt not long since in Perugia, a wealthy man named Pedrodi Vinciolo, who perhaps more to deceive some other, and restrainean evill opinion which the Perugians had conceived of him, in matterno way beseeming a man, then any beauty or good feature remaining inthe woman entred into the estate of marriage. And Fortune was soconforme to him in his election, that the woman whom he had made hiswife, had a yong, lusty, and well enabled bodie, a red-haird Wench,hot and fiery spirited, standing more in neede of three Husbands, thenhe, who could not any way well content one Wife, because his minde ranmore on his mony, then those offices and duties belonging towedlock, which time acquainted his Wife withall, contrary to herowne expectation, and those delights which the estate of marriageafforded, knowing her selfe also to be of a sprightly disposition, andnot to be easily tamed by houshold cares and attendances, shee waxedweary of her husbands unkind courses, upbraided him daily with harshspeeches, making his owne home meerly as a hell to him.

应用

1.  Theodoro falling in love with Violenta, the Daughter to hisMaster, named Amarigo, and she conceiving with child by him; wascondemned to be hanged. As they were leading him to the Gallowes,beating and misusing him all the way: he happened to be knowne ofhis owne Father, whereupon he was released, and afterward enjoyedViolenta in marriage.
2.  DECLARING WHAT AN HONOURABLE VERTUE COURTESIE IS, IN THEM
3.  WHEREIN SUCH MEN ARE COVERTLY REPREHENDED, WHO MAKE NO CARE OR
4、  When midday, and the heate thereof was well over-past, so that theaire seemed mild and temperate: according as the Queene had commanded;they were all seated againe about the Fountaine, with intent toprosecute their former pastime. And then Madame Neiphila, by thecharge imposed on her, as first speaker for this day, beganne asfolloweth.
5、  In the morning, he sent to the Bridegroom, and advertised him,that he (with a stranger newly arrived) intended to dine with him,which the Gentleman accepted in thankefull manner. And when dinnertime came, Thorello in his strange disguise went with the Abbot to theBridegroomes house, where he was lookt on with admiration of all theguests, but not knowne or suspected by any one; because the Abbotreported him to be a Sarracine, and sent by the Soldane (in Ambassage)to the King of France. Thorello was seated at a by-table, but directlyopposite to the new Bride, whom hee much delighted to looke on, andeasily collected by her sad countenance, that shee was scarcely wellpleased with this new nuptialls. She likewise beheld him very often,not in regard of any knowlege she took of him: for the bushiness ofhis beard, strangeness of habit, (but most of all) firm beleefe of hisdeath, was the maine prevention.

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网友评论(oAwCa1QZ44158))

  • 霍启刚 08-03

      Without imparting his mind unto any one, he would daily passe tooand fro before her doore; which she observing, and havingindifferently wounded him with her wanton piercing lookes: she beganto use the first tricke of her Trade, by pretending her enflamedaffection towards him, which made her pine and consume away in care,except he might be moved to pitty her. Whereupon, she sent one ofher Pandoraes unto him, perfectly instructed in the Art of aMaquerella, who (after many cunning counterfetted sighes, andteares, which she had alwayes ready at command) told him that hiscomely person and compleate perfections, had so wounded the very souleof her Mistresse, as she could enjoy no rest in any place, either byday or night. In regard whereof, she desired (above all things else)to meete with him privately in a Bathe: with which Wordes, shestraightway tooke a Ring forth of her pursse, and in most humblemanner, delivered it unto him, as a token from her Mistresse.

  • 李在勇 08-03

      A fond and foolish opinion overswayed her, that the Scholler wasextraordinarily skilfull in the Art of Nigromancy, and could therebyso over-rule the heart of her lost friend, as hee should bee compelledto love her againe, in as effectuall manner as before; herewithimmediately she acquainted her Lady, who being as rashly credulous, asher maide was opinionative (never considring, that if the Scholler hadany experience in Negromancy, hee would thereby have procured his ownesuccesse) gave releefe to her surmise, in very joviall and comfortablemanner, and entreated her in all kindnes, to know of him, whether hecould worke such a businesse, or no, and (upon his undertaking toeffect it) shee would give absolute assurance, that (in recompencethereof) he should unfainedly obtaine his hearts desire. Ancilla wasquicke and expeditious, in delivering this message to discontentedReniero, whose soule being ready to mount out of his body, onely byconceit of joy; chearefully thus he said within himselfe. GraciousFortune! how highly am I obliged to thee for this so great favour? Nowthou hast blest me with a happy time, to be justly revenged on sowicked a woman, who sought the utter ruine of my life, in recompenceof the unfaigned affection I bare her. Returne to thy Lady (quothhe) and saluting her first on my behalfe, bid her to abandon allcare in this businesse; for, if her amourous Friend were in India, Iwould make him come (in meere despight of his heart) and crave mercyof her for his base transgression. But concerning the meanes how,and in what manner it is to bee done, especially on her ownebehalfe: I will impart it to her so soone as she pleaseth: faile notto tell her so constantly from me, with all my utmost paines at herservice.

  • 何立海 08-03

       When the Lady beheld the fruites and flowers, and heard many otherthinges recounted, so wonderfully growing in the same Garden: began torepent her rash promise made; yet notwithstanding her repentance, asWomen are covetous to see all rarities; so, accompanied with diversLadies and Gentlewomen more, she went to see the Garden; and havingcommended it with much admiration, she returned home againe, themost sorrowfull Woman as ever lived, considering what she had tyed herselfe to, for enjoying this Garden. So excessive grew her griefe andaffliction, that it could not be so clouded or concealed: but herHusband tooke notice of it, and would needs understand the occasionthereof. Long the Lady (in regard of shame and modesty) sate withoutreturning any answer; but being in the end constrained, she disclosdthe whol History to him.

  • 汪俊伟 08-03

      Except he come, some comfort to procure,

  • 胡庆甫 08-02

    {  But, as we see it oftentimes come to passe, that by how much thelower hope declineth, so much the higher love ascendeth; even sofell it out with this poore Querry; for, most irkesome was it tohim, to endure the heavy waight of his continuall oppressions, nothaving any hope at all of the very least mitigation. And being utterlyunable to relinquish his love divers times he resolved on somedesperate conclusion, which might yet give the world an evidenttestimony, that he dyed for the love he bare to the Queene. And uponthis determination, hee grounded the successe of his future fortune,to dye in compassing some part of his desire, without eitherspeaking to the Queene, or sending any missive of his love; for tospeake or write, were meerely in vaine, and drew on a worserconsequence then death, which he could bestow on himselfe more easily,and when he listed.

  • 焦雪宛 08-01

      Can it be possible (quoth Helena) that you should be so benummedwith colde? Then I plainely perceive, that men can lye in their loveletters, which I can shew under your own hand, how you fryed inflames, and all for my love, and so have you written to me in everyletter. Poore credulous women are often thus deluded, in beleevingwhat men write and speake out of passion: but I will returne backeto my Brother, and make no doubt of dispatch, because I would gladlyhave your Company.}

  • 嘎玛嘎赤 08-01

      Every Vice (choice Ladies) as very well you know, redoundeth tothe great disgrace and prejudice of him, or her, by whom it ispractised, and oftentimes to others. Now, among those commonhurtfull enemies, the sinne or vice which most carrieth us with fullcarrere, and draweth us into unadvoydable dangers (in mine opinion)seemeth to be that of choller or anger, which is a sodain andinconsiderate moving, provoked by some received injury, which havingexcluded all respect of reason, and dimnd (with darke vapors) thebright discerning sight of the understanding, enflameth the minde withmost violent fury. And albeit this inconvenience hapneth most tomen, and more to some few then others, yet notwithstanding, it hathbene noted, that women have felt the selfesame infirmity, and inmore extreme manner, because it much sooner is kindled in them, andburneth with the brighter flame, in regard they have the lesserconsideration, and therefore not to be wondred at. For if we wiladvisedly observe, we shall plainely perceive, that fire even of hisowne nature) taketh hold on such things as are light and tender,much sooner then it can on hard and weighty substances; and some of uswomen (let men take no offence at my words) are farre more soft anddelicate then they be, and therefore more fraile. In which regard,seeing wee are naturally enclined hereto, and considering also, howmuch our affability and gentlenesse do shew themselves pleasing andfull of content to those men with whom we are to live; and likewise,how anger and fury are compacted of extraordinary perils: I purpose(because we may be the more valiant in our courage, to outstand thefierce assaults of wrath and rage) to shew you by mine ensuing Novell,how the loves of three yong Gentlemen, and of as many Gentlewomen,came to fatall and fortunat successe by the tempestuous anger of oneamong them, as I have formerly related unto you.

  • 桑妮莎 08-01

      Except he come, some comfort to procure,

  • 古丽巴 07-31

       WHEREIN IS DECLARED, WHAT CRAFT AND SUBTILTY SOME WILY WITS

  • 张咪 07-29

    {  "In which notorious transgression, I understand you all to beguiltie, if common fame speake truely, concerning the marriage of myselfe and Sophronia, whom you imagined as given to Gisippus; for younever remember that it was so ordained from eternitie, shee to bemine, and no Wife for Gisippus, as at this instant is made manifest byfull effect. But because the kinde of speaking, concerning divineprovidence, and intention of the Gods, may seeme a difficult matter tomany, and somewhat hard to bee understood: I am content to presuppose,that they meddle not with any thing of ours, and will onely stay myselfe on humane reasons, and in this nature of speech, I shall beenforced to doe two things, quite contrary to my naturall disposition.The one is, to speake somewhat in praise and commendation of my selfe:And the other, justly to blame and condemne other mens seemingestimation. But because both in the one and the other, I doe notintend to swerve a jot from the Truth, and the necessitie of thepresent case in question, doth not onely require, but also command it,you must pardon what I am to say.

  • 阮晨 07-29

      THEIR UNLAWFULL DESIRES

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