0 注册pt老虎送体验金-APP安装下载

注册pt老虎送体验金 注册最新版下载

注册pt老虎送体验金 注册

注册pt老虎送体验金注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:蒋皓 大小:SriMons721853KB 下载:Q6cdvGXs59034次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:duD15c2H66237条
日期:2020-08-04 16:39:31
安卓
陆昊

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Ischia is an Iland very neere to Naples, wherein (not long since)lived a faire and lovely Gentlewoman, named Restituta, Daughter to aGentleman of the same Isle, whose name was Marino Bolgaro. A properyouth called Guion, dwelling also in a neere neighbouring Isle, calledProcida, did love her as dearly as his owne life, and she was asintimately affected towards him. Now because the sight of her washis onely comfort, as occasion gave him leave, he resorted to Ischiavery often in the day time, and as often also in the night season,when any Barke passed from Procida to Ischia; if to see nothingelse, yet to behold the walles that enclosed his Mistresse thus.
2.  IN JUST REPROOFE OF SUCH FOOLISH MEN, AS WILL BE GOVERNED BY
3.  Biancafiore, having thus received the five hundred Florines, theindiction of the Almanacke began to alter: and whereas (before)Salabetto could come see her whensoever he pleased, many occasions nowhappened, whereby he came seven times for once, and yet his entrancewas scarsely admitted, neither was his entertainment so affable, orhis cheare so bountifull, as in his former accesses thither. Moreover,when the time for repaiment was come, yea a moneth or two over-past,and he demanded to have his money; hee could have nothing but wordsfor paiment. Now he began to consider on the craft and cunning of thiswicked Woman, as also his owne shallow understanding, knowing he couldmake no proofe of his debt, but what her selfe listed to say, havingneither witnes, specialty, bill or bond to shew: which made hisfolly so shamefull to him, that he durst not complaine to anyperson, because he had received some advertisements before, whereto hewold by no means listen, and now should have no other amends, butpublike infamie, scorne and disgrace, which made him almost weary ofhis life, and much to bemoane his owne unhappinesse. He receivedalso divers Letters from his Master, to make returne of the 500Florines over by way of banke, according as he had used to do: butnowe could performe no such matter.
4.  Mistresse want-wit presently answered, shee was well contented, thatGod Cupid should love her, and she would returne the like loveagaine to him; protesting withill, that wheresoever shee should seehis majesticall picture, she would set a hallowed burning Taper beforeit. Moreover, at all times he should be most welcome to her,whensoever hee would vouchsafe to visite her; for, he should alwayesfinde her alone in her private Chamber: on this condition, that hisolde Love Psyches, and all other beauties else whatsoever, must be setaside, and none but her selfe onely to be his best Mistresse,referring his personall forme of appearance, to what shape himselfebest pleased to assume, so that it might not be frightfull, oroffensive to her.
5.  The Mother loving her Daughter dearely, as being somewhatover-fond of her, and very willing to give her contentment; promisedto impart her minde to her Father, not doubting but to compasse whatshee requested. When she had mooved the matter to Messer Lizio whoseage made him somewhat froward and teasty; angerly said to his wife.Why how now woman? Cannot our Daughter sleepe, except she heare theNightingale sing? Let there be a bed made for her in the Oven, andthere let the Crickets make her melody. When Catharina heard thisanswere from her Father, and saw her desire to be disappointed; notonely could she take any rest the night following, but also complainedmore of the heate then before, not suffering her Mother to take anyrest, which made her go angerly to her Husband in the morning, saying.Why Husband, have we but one onely Daughter, whom you pretend tolove right dearly, and yet can you be so carelesse of her, as to denieher a request, which is no more then reason? What matter is it toyou or me, to let her lodge in the Garden Gallery? Is her youngblood to be compared with ours? Can our weake and crazie bodies, feelethe frolicke temper of hers? Alas, she is hardly (as yet) out of herchildish yeeres, and Children have many desires farre differing fromours: the singing of Birdes is rare musicke to them, and chiefly theNightingale; whose sweete notes will provoke them to rest, whenneither Art or Physicke can do it.
6.  THE EIGHT DAY, THE TENTH NOVELL

计划指导

1.  DECLARING, THAT LOVE NOT ONELY MAKES A MAN PRODIGALL, BUT ALSO AN
2.  Distrust did never enter in my thoughts.
3.  When Gasparuolo was come from Genway, Gulfardo observing aconvenient time, when he was sitting at the doore with his Wife; tookehis Friend with him, and comming to Gasparuolo, said. Worthy Sir,the two hundred Crownes which you lent me before your journy toGeneway, in regard they could not serve my turne, to compasse thebusinesse for which I borrowed them: within a day or two after, in thepresence of this Gentle man my friend, I made repayment of them toyour Wife, and therefore I pray you crosse me out of your booke.
4.  Philostratus, I intend not to varie from those courses heretoforeobserved by my predecessors, but even as they have already done, so itis my authority, to command a Song. And because I am well assured,that you are not unfurnished of Songs answerable to the quality of thepassed Novels: my desire is, in regard we would not be troubledhereafter, with any more discourses of unfortunate Love, that youshall sing a Song agreeing with your owne disposition. Philostratusmade answer, that hee was ready to accomplish her command, and withoutall further ceremony, thus he began.
5.  Gentlemen and Gentlewomen, you know you have kept a commendablecustom, in sending yeerly to the poore brethren of our Lord Baron S.Anthony, both of your Corne and other provision, some more, somelesse, all according to their power, means, and devotion, to the endthat blessed S. Anthony should be the more carefull of your oxen,sheep, asses, swine, pigs, and other cattle. Moreover, you have usedto pay (especially such as have their names registred in ourFraternity) those duties which annually you send unto us. For thecollection whereof, I am sent by my Superior, namely our L. Abbot, andtherfore (with Gods blessing) you may come after noone hither, whenyou shal heare the Bels of the Church ring: then wil I make apredication to you; you shall kisse the Crosse, and beside, becauseI know you al to be most devout servants to our Lord Baron S. Anthony,in especiall grace and favor, I wil shew you a most holy and goodlyRelique, which I my selfe (long since) brought from the holy Landbeyond the seas. If you desire to know what it is, let me tell you,that it is one of the Feathers of the same Phoenix, which was in theArke with the Patriarch Noah. And having thus spoken, he becamesilent, returning backe to heare Masse. While hee delivered theseand the like speeches, among the other people then in the church,there were two shrewde and crafty Companions; the one, named John deBragoniero, and the other, Biagio Pizzino. These subtile Fellowes,after they had heard the report of Fryer Onyons Relique: althoghthey were his intimate friends, and came thither in his company; yetthey concluded betweene themselves, to shew him a tricke ofLegierdumaine, and to steale the Feather from him. When they hadintelligence of Friar Onyons dining that day at the Castle, with aworthy Friend of his: no sooner was he set at the Table, but away wentthey in all haste, to the Inne where the Fryar frequented, with thisdetermination, that Biagio should hold conference with the Friars boy,while his fellow ransackt the Wallet, to finde the Feather, andcarry it away with him, for a future observation, what the Friar wouldsay unto the people, when he found the losse of the Feather, and couldnot performe his promise to them.
6.  With these, and the like crosse entercourses, he often mockthimselfe, falling into the contrary, and then to this againe, and fromthe contrary, into another kind of alteration, wasting and consuminghimselfe, not only this day and the night following, but many moreafterward, til he lost both his feeding and sleepe, so that throughdebility of body, he was constrained to keepe his bed. Gisippus, whohad divers dayes noted his melancholly disposition, and now hisfalling into extreamitie of sicknesse, was very sorry to behold it:and with all meanes and inventions he could devise to use, hee bothquestioned the cause of this straunge alteration, and essayed everieway, how hee might best comfort him, never ceassing to demaunde areason, why he should become thus sad and sickely. But Titus afterinfinite importuning (which still he answered) with idle and frivolousexcuses, farre from the truth indeede, and (to the no meane afflictionof his friend) when he was able to use no more contradictions; atlength, in sighes and teares, thus he replyed.

推荐功能

1.  Thy Vertues are many, and universally both divulged and knowen, inwhich respect, I make no doubt; but divers and sundrie great Lords andGentlemen (if but the least rumor of my death be noysed) will makesulte for thee to thy parents and brethren, from whose violentsolicitings, wouldst thou never so resolutely make resistance, yetthou canst not be able to defend thy selfe; but whether thou wilt orno, thou must yeeld to please them; and this is the only reason, why Iwould tie thee to this limited time, and not one day or minute longer.
2.  Ricciardo durst not speake one word, but still expressed his affablebehaviour towards her, bestowing infinite embraces and kisses onher: which so much the more augmented her rage and anger, continuingon her chiding thus. If by these flatteries and idle follies, thouhopest to comfort or pacifie me, thou runnest quite by as from thyreckoning; for I shall never imagine my selfe halfe satisfied,untill in the presence of my parents, friends, and neighbours, Ihave revealed thy base behaviour. Tell mee, treacherous man, am notI as faire, as the wife of Ricciardo? Am I not as good a Gentlewomanborne, as shee is? What canst thou more respect in her, then is inmee? Villaine, monster, why doest thou not answere mee? I will send toRicciardo, who loveth mee beyond all other women in Naples, and yetcould never vaunt, that I gave him so much as a friendly looke: heshall know, what a dishonour thou hadst intended towards him; whichboth he and his friends will revenge soundly upon thee. Theexclamations of the Lady were so tedious and irksome, that Ricciardoperceiving, if shee continued longer in these complaints, worsewould ensue thereon, then could bee easily remedied: resolved tomake himselfe knowne unto her, to reclaime her out of this violentextasie, and holding her somewhat strictly, to prevent her escapingfrom him, he said. Madam, afflict your selfe no further, for, what Icould not obtaine by simply loving you, subtilty hath better taughtme, and I am your Ricciardo: which she hearing, and perfectlyknowing him by his voyce; shee would have leapt out of the Bath, butshee could not, and to avoyde her crying out, he layde his hand on hermouth, saying. Lady, what is done, cannot now be undone, albeit youcried out all your life time. If you exclaime, or make this knowneopenly by any meanes; two unavoydable dangers must needes ensuethereon. The one (which you ought more carefully to respect) is thewounding of your good renowne and honour, because, when you shall say,that by treacherie I drew you hither: I will boldly maintaine thecontrary, avouching, that having corrupted you with gold, and notgiving you so much as covetously you desired; you grew offended, andthereon made the outcry, and you are not to learne, that the worldis more easily induced to beleeve the worst, then any goodnesse, be itnever so manifest. Next unto this, mortall hatred must arisebetweene your husband and mee, and (perhaps) I shall as soone killhim, as he me; whereby you can hardly, live in any true contentmentafter. Wherefore, joy of my life, doe not in one moment, both shameyour selfe, and cause such perill betweene your husband and me: foryou are not the first, neither can be the last, that shall bedeceived. I have not beguiled you, to take any honour from you, butonely declared, the faithfull affection I beare you, and so shalldoe for ever, as being your bounden and most obedient servant; andas it is a long time agoe, since I dedicated my selfe and all mineto your service, so hence-forth must I remaine for ever. You arewise enough (I know) in all other things: then shew your selfe notto be silly or simple in this.
3.  Now albeit he found her plyant enough, to gaine physicke for herowne griefe, as soone as his; yet the meanes and manner were (asyet) quite out of all apprehension. For shee in no other part of theWorld, would trust her selfe in the young mans company, but onely inher Fathers house; and that was a place out of all possibility,because Puccio (by a long continued custome) used to watchwell-neere all the night, as commonly he did, each night afterother, never stirring foorth of the roomes, which much abated the edgeof the young mans appetite. After infinite intricate revolvings,wheeling about his busied braine, he thought it not altogether anHerculian taske, to enjoy his happinesse in the house, and without anysuspition, albeit Puccio kept still within doores, and watched ashee was wont to doe.
4.  How sir? (quoth she,) your Barber? Uppon mine Honour, there shallcome no Barber heere. Why Sir, it is such a rotten Tooth, and standethso fairely for my hand: that, without helpe or advice of any Barber,let mee alone for plucking it forth without putting you to any paineat all. Moreover, let me tell you Sir, those Tooth-drawers are so rudeand cruell, in performing such Offices, as my heart cannot endure,that you should come within compasse of their currish courtesie,neither shall you Sir, if you will be ruled by me. If I should failein the manner of their facilitie, yet love and duty hath enstructedme, to forbeare your least paining, which no unmannerly Barber willdo.
5.   THE TENTH DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL
6.  No sooner were they arrived, but Pasimondo, the intended Husband forIphigenia (who had already heard the tydings) went and complained tothe Senate, who appointed a Gentleman of Rhodes named Lysimachus,and being that yeere soveraigne Magistrate over the Rhodians, to gowell provided for the apprehension of Chynon and his company,committing them to prison, which accordingly was done. In this manner,the poore unfortunate lover Chynon, lost his faire Iphigenia, havingwon her in so short a while before, and scarsely requited with so muchas a kisse. But as for Iphigenia, she was royally welcommed by manyLords and Ladies of Rhodes, who so kindely comforted her, that shesoone forgotte all her greefe and trouble on the Sea, remaining incompany of those Ladies and Gentlewomen, untill the day determined forher marriage.

应用

1.  THE FIRST DAY, THE NINTH NOVELL
2.  The night being over-past with infinite feares and afrights, andbright day saluting the world againe, with the expence of ninehoures and more, she fell to her former fruitlesse travailes. Beingsomewhat sharply bitten with hunger, because the former day andnight shee had not tasted any foode: shee made therefore a benefitof necessity, and fed on the greene hearbes so well as she could,not without any piercing afflictions, what should become of her inthis extraordinary misery. As shee walked in these pensivemeditations, she saw a Goate enter into a Cave, and (within a whileafter) come forth againe, wandring along thorow the woods. Whereuponshe stayed, and entred where she saw the beast issue foorth, where shefound two young Kids, yeaned (as it seemed) the selfesame day, whichsight was very pleasing to her, and nothing in that distresse couldmore content her.
3.  Moreover, he prosecuted his impious purpose with such alluringperswasions: that being a weake woman, and not willing to endureover many Amorous proofes (onely to acquaint you with his mostsawcie immodestie, and to revenge your selfe uppon him as best youmay; your selfe beeing best able to pronounce him guiltie) I madehim promise, to meete him in our Garden, presently aftermidde-night, and to finde mee sitting under the Pine-Tree; nevermeaning (as I am vertuous) to be there. But, that you may know thedeceite and falshoode of your Servant, I would have you to put on myNight-gowne, my head Attire, and Chinne-cloath, and sitting but ashort while there underneath the Pine-Tree: such is his insatiatedesire, as he will not faile to come, and then you may proceede, asyou finde occasion.
4、  Philostratus had no sooner concluded his Novell, and the wholeAssembly laughed Madame thereat: but the Queen gave command toMadame Philomena, that shee should follow next in order; whereuponthus shee began. Worthy Ladies, as Philostratus, by calling to memoriethe name of Maso del Saggio, hath contented you with another merryNovell concerning him: In the same manner must I intreat you, toremember once againe Calandrino and his subtle by a pretty talewhich I meane to tell ow, and in what manner they were revenged onhim, for going to seeke the invisible Stone.
5、  Genevra kneeling before him weeping, wringing her hands, thusreplyed. Wilt thou turne Monster, and be a murtherer of her that neverwronged thee, to please another man, and on a bare command? God, whotruly knoweth all things, is my faithfull witnesse, that I nevercommitted any offence, whereby to deserve the dislike of my Husband,much lesse so harsh a recompence as this is. But flying from mine ownejustification, and appealing to thy manly mercy, thou mayest (wertthou but so well pleased) in a moment satisfie both thy Master and me,in such manner as I will make plaine and apparant to thee. Take thoumy garments, spare me onely thy doublet, and such a Bonnet as isfitting for a man, so returne with my habite to thy Master, assuringhim, that the deede is done. And here I sweare to thee, by that lifewhich I enjoy but by thy mercy, I will so strangely disguise my selfe,and wander so far off from these Countries, as neither he or thou, norany person belonging to these parts, shall ever heare any tydings ofme.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(4NoB6LDK87667))

  • 刘长忠 08-03

      No soule so comfortlesse, etc.

  • 吴心韬 08-03

      Juliet of Narbona, cured the King of France of a daungerous Fistula,in recompence whereof, she requested to enjoy as her husband inmarriage, Bertrand Count of Roussilion. Hee having married her againsthis will, as utterly despising her, went to Florence, where hee madelove to a young Gentlewoman. Juliet, by a queint and cunning policy,compassed the meanes (insted of his chosen new friend) to lye with herowne husband, by whom shee conceived, and had two Sonnes; whichbeing afterward made knowne unto Count Bertrand, he accepted herinto his favour againe, and loved her as his loyall and honourablewife.

  • 茂和畅 08-03

       The Pope, who was of a magnanimious spirit, and one that highlyaffected men of vertue, hearing the commendable motion made by theAbbot; returned answere, that he was as willing to grant it, as theother desired it, sending Letters of safe conduct for his commingthither. Ghinotto receiving such assurance from the Court of Rome,came thither immediatly, to the great joy of the Lord Abbot: and thePope finding him to be a man of valor and worth, uponreconciliation, remitted all former errors, creating him knight, andLord Prior of the very chiefest Hospitall in Rome. In which Officehe lived long time after, as a loyall servant to the Church, and anhonest thankefull friend to the Lord Abbot of Clugny.

  • 乌来 08-03

      Opinion hath made it famous for long time, that the Seacoast ofRhegium to Gaieta, is the onely delactable part of all Italy, wherein,somewhat neere to Salerno, is a shore looking upon the Sea, whichthe inhabitants there dwelling, doe call the coast of Malfy, full ofsmall Townes, Gardens, Springs, and wealthy men, trading in as manykindes of Merchandizes, as any other people that I know. Among whichTownes, there is one, named Ravello, wherein (as yet to this day thereare rich people) there was (not long since) a very wealthy man,named Landolpho Ruffolo, who being not contented with his riches,but coveting to multiply them double and trebble, fell in danger, toloose both himselfe and wealth together. This man (as otherMerchants are wont to doe) after hee had considered on his affaires,bought him a very goodly Ship, lading it with divers sorts ofMerchandizes, all belonging to himselfe onely, and making his voyageto the Isle of Cyprus. Where he found, over and beside theMerchandizes he had brought thither, many Ships more there arrived,and all laden with the same commodities, in regard whereof, it wasneedefull for him, not onely to make a good Mart of his goods; butalso was further constrained (if hee meant to vent his commodities) tosell them away (almost) for nothing, endangering his utter destructionand overthrow. Whereupon, grieving exceedingly at so great a losse,not knowing what to doe, and seeing, that from very aboundantwealth, hee was likely to fall into as low poverty: he resolved todie, or to recompence his losses upon others, because he would notreturne home poore, having departed thence so rich.

  • 陶天月 08-02

    {  Or else in gentle breasts to moove sterne Warre,

  • 邱永峥 08-01

      Arriguccio Berlinghieri, became immeasurably jelous of his WifeSimonida, who fastened a thred about her great toe, for to serve asa small, when her amorous friend should come to visite her. Arrigucciofindeth the fallacie, and while he pursueth the amorous friend, sheecauseth her Maide to lye in her bed against his returne: whom hebeateth extreamly, cutting away the lockes of her haire (thinking hehad doone all this violence to his wife Simonida:) and afterwardfetcheth her Mother and Brethren, to shame her before them, and sobe rid of her. But they finding all his speeches to be utterlyfalse; and reputing him to bee a drunken jealous foole; all theblame and disgrace falleth on himselfe.}

  • 门布乡 08-01

      You are to understand then, that it is no long while since, whenthere dwelt in Paris a Florentine Gentleman, who falling into decay ofhis estate, by over-bountifull expences; undertooke the degree of aMerchant, and thrived so well by his trading, that he grew to greatwealth, having one onely sonne by his wife, named Lodovico. ThisSonne, partaking somewhat in his Fathers former height of minde, andno way inclineable to deale in Merchandize, had no meaning to be aShopman, and therefore accompanied the Gentlemen of France, insundry services for the King; among whom, by his singular goodcarriage and qualites, he happened to be not meanly esteemed. Whilethus he continued in the Court, it chanced, that certaine Knights,returning from Jerusalem, having there visited the holy Sepulcher, andcomming into company where Lodovico was: much familiar discoursepassed amongst them, concerning the faire women of France, England,and other parts of the world where they had bin, and what delicatebeauties they had seene.

  • 吕绍刚 08-01

      Ravenna being a very ancient City in Romania, there dwelt sometime agreat number of worthy Gentlemen, among whom I am to speake of onemore especially, named Anastasio, descended from the Family of theHonesti, who by the death of his Father, and an Unckle of his, wasleft extraordinarily abounding in riches, and growing to yearesfitting for marriage, (as young Gallants are easily apt enough todo) he became enamored of a very bountifull Gentlewoman, who wasDaughter to Signior Paulo Traversario, one of the most ancient andnoble Families in all the Countrey. Nor made he any doubt, but byhis meanes and industrious endeavour, to derive affection from heragaine; for he carried himselfe like a brave-minded Gentleman,liberall in his expences, honest and affable in all his actions, whichcommonly are the true notes of a good nature, and highly to becommended in any man. But, howsoever Fortune became his enemy, theselaudable parts of manhood did not any way friend him, but ratherappeared hurtfull to himselfe: so cruell, unkind, and almost meerelysavage did she shew her selfe to him; perhaps in pride of her singularbeauty, or presuming on her nobility by birth, both which are ratherblemishes, then ornaments in a woman, especially when they be abused.

  • 刘亚萍 07-31

       John de Barolo, at the instance and request of his Gossip Pietroda Tresanti, made an enchantment, to have his wife become a Mule.And when it came to the fastening on of the taile; Gossip Pietro bysaying she should have no taile at all, spoyled the whole enchantment.

  • 王辰光 07-29

    {  And the Abbesse still continuing her harsh speeches, it fortuned,that Isabella raising her head, which before she dejected into hirbosome, espied the breeches on her head, with the stockings hanging oneither side of her; the sight whereof did so much encourage her,that boldly she said. Madam, let a poore offender advise you for tomend your veile, and afterward say to me what you will.

  • 刘绍唐 07-29

      Nathan lovingly raised Mithridanes from the ground, then kissing hischeeke, and tenderly embracing him, he said. Sonne, thou needest notto aske, much less to obtaine pardon, for any enterprise of thine,which thou canst not yet terme to be good or bad: because thousoughtest not to bereave me of my life, for any hatred thou barest me,but onely in coveting to be reputed the Woorthier man. Take thenthis assurance of me, and beleeve it constantly, that there is noman living, whom I love and honour, as I do thee: considering thegreatnesse of thy minde, which consisteth not in the heaping up ofmoney, as wretched and miserable Worldlings make it their onelyfelicity; but, contending in bounty to spend what is thine, didst holdit for no shame to kil me, thereby to make thy selfe so much themore worthily famous.

提交评论