0 一分快乐八app-APP安装下载

一分快乐八app 注册最新版下载

一分快乐八app 注册

一分快乐八app注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:杨高中 大小:E4qRd9tG85038KB 下载:o9C4QUPO61027次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:tcSODrlW12583条
日期:2020-08-05 10:55:52
安卓
惠英红

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  WHEREBY THE AUTHOR, APPROVING THE CHRISTIAN FAITH,
2.  Thus the innocent Count, by his overhasty and sodaine flight, madehimselfe guilty of this foule imputation: and arriving at Callice withhis children, their poore and homely habites, hid them from beingknowne, and thence they crossed over into England, staying no whereuntill hee came to London. Before he would enter into the City, hegave divers good advertisements to his children, but especially twoprecepts above all the rest. First, with patient soules to support thepoore condition, whereto Fortune (without any offence in him orthem) had thus dejected them. Next, that they should have mostheedfull care, at no time to disclose from whence they came, orwhose children they were, because it extended to the perill of theirlives. His Sonne, being named Lewes, and now about nine yeares old,his Daughter called Violenta, and aged seaven yeares, did both observetheir fathers direction, as afterward it did sufficiently appeare. Andbecause they might live in the safer securitie, hee thought it for thebest to change their names, calling his Sonne Perotto, and hisDaughter Gianetta, for thus they might best escape unknowne.
3.  Of sighes or teares, which joy doth countercheck:
4.  When I lived at ease,
5.  Tancrede, Prince of Salerne (which City, before the Consulles ofRome held dominion in that part of Italy, stoode free, and thence(perchance) tooke the moderne title of a Principality was a veryhumane Lord, and of ingenious nature; if, in his elder yeeres, hehad not soiled his hands in the blood of Lovers, especially one ofthem, being both neere and deere unto him. So it fortuned, that duringthe whole life time of this Prince, he had but one onely daughter(albeit it had beene much better, if he had had at all) whom he sochoisely loved and esteemed, as never was any childe more deerelyaffected of a Father: and so farre extended his over-curious respectof her, as he would seldome admit her to be forth of his sight;neither would he suffer her to marry, although she had outstept (bydivers yeeres) the age meete for marriage.
6.  When Signior Ansaldo heard her demand, and the offer besidethereuppon made him (although it seemed no easie matter, but a thingmeerly impossible to be done) he considered advisedly, that she madethis motion to no other end, but onely to bereave him of all his hope,ever to enjoy what so earnestly hee desired: neverthelesse, he wouldnot so give it utterly over, but would needs approve what could bedone. Heereupon, hee sent into divers partes of the world, to find outany one that was able to advise him in this doubtfull case. In theend, one was brought to him, who beeing well recompenced for hispaines, by the Art of Nigromancie would under take to do it. Withhim Signior Ansaldo covenanted, binding himselfe to pay a greatsumme of mony, upon performance of so rare a deed, awaiting (inhopefull expectation) for the month of januaries comming. It beingcome, and the weather then in extreamity of cold, every beingcovered with ice and snow, the Magitian prevailed so by his Art,that after the Christmas Holy dayes were past, and the Calends ofjanuary entred: in one night, and without the Cittie Wals, thegoodliest Garden of flowers and fruites, was sodainely sprung up, as(in opinion of such as beheld it) never was the like seen before.Now Ladies, I think I need not demand the question, whether SigniorAnsaldo were wel pleased, or no, who going to beholde t, saw it mostplenteously stored, with al kind of fruit trees, flowers, herbes andplants, as no one could be named, that was wanting in this artificiallgarden. And having gathered some pretty store of them, secretly hesent them to Madam Dianora, inviting hir to come see her Garden,perfected according to her owne desire, and uppon view thereof, toconfesse the integrity of his love to her; considering andremembring withall, the promise shee had made him under solemneoath, that she might be reputed for a woman of her word.

计划指导

1.  When day appeared, and the violent stormes were more mildly appeasedthe Ladie, who seemed well-neere dead, lifted up her head, and began(weake as she was) to call first one, and then another: but sheecalled in vaine, for such as she named were farre enough from her.Wherefore, hearing no answere, nor seeing any one, she wondredgreatly, her feares encreasing then more and more. Raising her selfeso well as shee could, she beheld the Ladies that were of her company,and some other of her women, lying still without any stirring:whereupon, first jogging one, and then another, and calling themseverally by their names; shee found them bereft of understanding, andeven as if they were dead, their hearts were so quayled, and theirfeare so over-ruling, which was no meane dismay to the poore Ladyher selfe. Neverthelesse, necessity now being her best counsellor,seeing her selfe thus all alone, and not knowing in what place sheewas, shee used such meanes to them that were living, that (at thelast) they came to better knowledge of themselves. And being unable toguesse, what was become of the men and Marriners, seeing the Ship alsodriven on the sands, and filled with water, she began with them tolament most greevously: and now it was about the houre of mid day,before they could descry any person on the shore, or any els to pitythem in so urgent a necessity.
2.  Which mortall tongue or thought, what ere it be
3.  The Judge, without any delay at all, gave eare to the busines, andexamined the case very strictly: but could by no meanes comprehend,that any malice should appeare in her towards him, nor that she wasguiltie of the mans death. Wherefore, in the presence of Simonida,he desired to see the dead body, and the place where he fell downedead, because there he intended to have her relate, how she saw theaccident to happen, that her owne speeches might the sooner condemneher, whereas the case yet remained doubtfull, and farre beyond hiscomprehension. So, without any further publication, and to avoid thefollowing of the turbulent multitude, they departed from the benchof Justice, and came to the place, where Pasquinoes body lay swolnelike a Tunne. Demanding there questions, concerning his behaviour,when they walked there in conference together, and, not a littleadmiring the manner of his death, while he stood advisedly consideringthereon.
4.  By this time, the kindred and friends to the dead man (uppon noiseof his death bruited abroad) were likewise come to the Pallace, yea,most of the men and women dwelling in the Cittie, the bodie ofGabriello being laide in the midst of the Court, upon the whiteDamaske shrowd given by Andreana, with infinite Roses and othersweet Flowers lying theron: and such was the peoples love to him, thatnever was any mans death, more to be bemoaned and lamented. Beingdelivered out of the Court, it was carried to buriall, not like aBurgesse or ordinary Citizen, but with such pompe as beseemed a LordBaron, and on the shoulders of very noble Gentlemen, with greathonor and reverence.
5.  When he had walked through the thicket, it came to passe, that (evenas good Fortune guided him) hee came into a faire Meadow, on everyside engirt with and in one corner thereof stoode a goodlyFountaine, whose current was both coole and cleare. Hard by it, uponthe greene grasse, he espied a very beautifull young Damosell, seemingto be fast asleepe, attired in such fine loose garments, as hidde verylittle of her white body: onely from the girdle downward, she ware akirtle made close unto her, of interwoven delicate silke; and at herfeete lay two other Damosels sleeping, and a servant in the samemanner. No sooner had Chynon fixed his eye upon her, but he stoodleaning upon his staffe; and viewed her very advisedly, withoutspeaking word, and in no meane admiration, as if he had never seenethe forme of a woman before. He began then to feele in his harshrurall understanding (whereinto never till now, either by painfullinstruction, or all other good meanes used to him, any honest civilityhad power of impression) a strange kinde of humour to awake, whichinformed his grosse and dull spirite, that this Damosell was thevery fairest, which ever any living man beheld.
6.  If this accident were displeasing to poore Chynon, I thinke thequestion were in vaine demanded: for now it seemeth to him, that theGodds had granted his cheefe desire, to the end he should dye with thegreater anguish, in losing both his love and life together. Hisfriends likewise, felte the selfesame affliction, but especiallyIphigenia, who wept and greeved beyond all measure, to see the shipbeaten with such stormy billowes, as threatned her sinking everyminute. Impatiently she cursed the love of Chynon, greatly blaming hisdesperate boldnesse, and maintaining, that so violent a tempestcould never happen, but onely by the Gods displeasure, who would notpermit him to have a wife against their will; and therefore thuspunished his proud presumption, not onely in his unavoidable death,but also that her life must perish for company.

推荐功能

1.  Silvestra lay on the same side of the bed, where Jeronimo had hidhimselfe behinde the Curtaines; who stepping softly to her in thedarke, and laying his hand gently on her brest, saide: Deare Love,forbeare a little while to sleepe, for heere is thy loyall friendJeronimo. The yong woman starting with amazement, would have criedout, but that he entreated her to the contrary; protesting, that hecame for no ill intent to her, but onely to take his latest leave ofher. Alas Jeronimo (quoth she) those idle dayes are past and gone,when it was no way unseemly for our youth, to entertaine equality ofthose desires, which then well agreed with our young blood. Sincewhen, you have lived in forraine Countries, which appeared to me toalter your former disposition: for, in the space of two wholeyeares, either you grew forgetfull of me (as change of ayre, maychange affection) or (at the best) made such account of me, as I neverheard the least salutation from you. Now you know me to be a marriedwife, in regard whereof, my thoughts have embraced that chaste andhonourable resolution, not to minde any man but my husband; andtherefore, as you are come hither Without my love or license, so inlike manner I do desire you to be gone. Let this priviledge of myHusbandes sound sleeping, be no colour to your longer continuing here,or encourage you to finde any further favour at mine hand: for if minehusband should awake, beside the danger that thereon may follow toyou, I cannot but loose the sweet happinesse of peacefull life,which hitherto we have both mutually embraced.
2.  But, to compaise more familiar acquaintance with Belcolore, hee senther sundry gifts and presents, day by day, as sometime a bunch ofdainty greene Garlicke, whereof he had plenty growing in his Garden,which he manured with his owne hands, and better then all the countreyyeelded; otherwhiles a small basket of Pease or Benes, and Onyons orScallions, as the season served. But when he could come in place whereshe was; then he darted amourous wincks and glances at her, withbecks, nods, and blushes, Loves private Ambassadours, which shee(being but countrey-bred) seeming by outward appearance, not to see,retorted disdainefully, and forthwith would absent her selfe, sothat sweet Sir Simon laboured still in vaine, and could not compassewhat he coveted.
3.  The King of Cyprus was wittily reprehended, by the words of aGentlewoman of Gascoignie, and became vertuously altered from hisvicious disposition.
4.  Piero being a Prince, of most liberall and benigne nature, havingafterward divers times considered on the matters which Manutio hadrevealed to him, knowing also the yong Maiden, to bee bothbeautifull and vertuous: was so much moved with pitty of herextremitie, as mounting on horsebacke in the evening, and seeming asif he rode abroad for his private recreation; he went directly tothe Apothecaries house, where desiring to see a goodly garden,appertaining then to the Apothecarie, he dismounted from his horse.Walking into the garden, he began to question with Bernardo,demaunding him for his Daughter, and whether he had (as yet) marryedher, or no? My Gracious Lord, answered Bernardo, as yet shee is notmarryed, neither likely to bee, in regard shee hath had a long andtedious sickenesse: but since Dinner time, she is indifferentlyeased of her former violent paine, which we could not discerne thelike alteration in her, a long while before.
5.   Already had the bright Sunne renewed the day every where with hissplendant beames, and the Birds sate merrily singing on the bloomingbranches, yeelding testimony thereof to the eares of all hearers; whenthe seven Ladies, and the three Gentlemen (after they were risen)entered the Gardens, and there spent some time in walking, as alsomaking of Nose-gayes and Chaplets of Flowers. And even as they haddone the day before, so did they now follow the same course; for,after they had dined, in a coole and pleasing aire they fell todancing, and then went to sleepe a while, from which being awaked,they tooke their places (according as it pleased the Queene toappoint) in the same faire Meadow about her. And she, being a goodlycreature, and highly pleasing to behold, having put on her Crowne ofLawrell, and giving a gracious countenance to the whole company;commanded Madam Neiphila that her Tale should begin this daiesdelight. Whereupon she, without returning any excuse or deniall, beganin this manner.
6.  THE INDUCTION TO THE SIXT DAY

应用

1.  When they had spent a long while in this or the like conference,with infinite sweet kisses and embraces intermixed; then she beganagaine in this manner. Deare love (quoth she) cast thy Cloake aboutthee, as I intend to doe with my night mantle, and let us step tothe little window once more, to see whether the flaming fire, whichburned in the Schollers brest (as daily avouched to me in his loveletters) be as yet extinct or no. So going to the window againe, andlooking downe into the Court; there they saw the Scholler dancing inthe snow, to the cold tune of his teeths quivering and chattering, andclapping his armes about his body, which was no pleasing melody tohim. How thinkest thou now sweet heart (saide cannot I make a mandaunce without the sound of a Taber, or of a Bagpipe? yes beleeve meLady (quoth he) I plaine pereive you can, and would be very lothe,that at should exercise your cunning on me.
2.  Considering vowes were past, and what else may
3.  Ah my dearest Love, I am utterly undone, because the Shippecontaining the rest of mine expected Merchandises, is taken by thePyrates of Monago, and put to the ransome of tenne thousand Florinesof Gold, and my part particularly, is to pay one thousand. At thisinstant I am utterly destitute of money, because the five hundredFlorines which I received of you, I sent hence the next daie followingto Naples, to buy more cloathes, which likewise are to be sent hither.And if I should now make sale of the Merchandizes in my Magazine(the time of generall utterance being not yet come) I shall not make apennyworth for a penny. And my misfortune is the greater, because I amnot so well knowne heere in your City, as to find some succour in suchan important distresse; wherfore I know not what to do or say.Moreover, if the money be not speedily sent, our goods will be carriedinto Monago, and then they are past all redemption utterly.
4、  Lascivious desire, and no religious devotion, made him draw neereher, and whether under shrift (the onely cloake to compasse carnalaffections) or some other as close conference to as pernitious andvile a purpose, I know not: but so farre he prevailed upon herfrailety, and such a bargaine passed betweene them, that from theChurch, he wonne her to his Chamber, before any person couldperceive it. Now, while this yong lusty Monke (transported withoverfond affection) was more carelesse of his dalliance, then heshould have bene: the Lord Abbot being newly arisen from sleepe, andwalking softly about the Cloyster, came to the Monkes Dorter doore,where hearing what noyse was made betweene them, and a femininevoyce more strange then hee was wont to heare; he layed his eare closeto the Chamber doore, and plainly perceived, that a woman waswithin. Wherewith being much moved, he intended sodainly to make himopen the doore; but (upon better consideration) hee conceyved it farremore fitting for him, to returne backe to his owne Chamber, andtarry till the Monke should come forth.
5、  That robd me of my Basiles blisse, etc.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(T1w2i11u89265))

  • 诺曼·柯尔曼 08-04

      Come lovely Nymphes, lend hands mine eyes to close,

  • 曾宝仪 08-04

      The courteous demeanor of Madam Aemilia, and the quaintnesse ofher discourse, caused both the Queene, and the rest of the company, tocommend the invention of carrying the Crosse, and the goldenoyntment appointed for pennance. Afterward, Philostratus, who was inorder to speake next, began in this manner.

  • 钟佳妮 08-04

       Within a short while after her departure, the Gentleman, of whomeshe made this counterfeit complaint, came thither, as was his usuallmanner, and having done his duty to the holy Father, they sate downetogether privately, falling out of one discourse into another. Atthe length, the Friar (in very loving and friendly sort) mildlyreproved him for such amorous glaunces, and other pursuites, which (ashe thought) he dayly used to the Gentlewoman, according to her ownespeeches. The Gentleman mervalled greatly thereat, as one that hadnever seene her, and very sildome passed by the way where sheedwelt, which made him the bolder in his answeres; wherein theConfessour interrupting him, saide. Never make such admiration atthe matter, neyther waste more words in deniall, because they cannotserve thy turne; I tell thee plainely, I heard these words even fromher owne selfe, in a very sorowfull and sad complaint. And though(perhaps) heereafter, thou canst very hardly refraine such follies;yet let me tell thee so much of her (and under the seale of absoluteassurance) that she is the onely woman of the world, who to myjudgement, doth abhorre all such base behaviour. In regard thereforeof thine owne honour, as also not to vex and prejudice so vertuous aGentlewoman, I pray thee refraine such idlenesse henceforward, andsuffer her to live in peace.

  • 欧凯龙 08-04

      Not long since, there lived in the City of Trevers, an Almaine orGermaine, named Arriguo, who being a poore man, served as a Porter, orburden-bearer for money, when any man pleased to employ him. Andyet, notwithstanding his poore and meane condition, he was generallyreputed, to be of good and sanctified life. In which regard (whetherit were true or no, I know not) it happened, that when he died (atleast as the men of Trevers themselves affirmed) in the very instanthoure of his departing, all the Belles in the great Church of Trevers,(not being pulled by the helpe of any hand) beganne to ring: whichbeing accounted for a miracle, every one saide; that this Arriguohad bene, and was a Saint. And presently all the people of the Cityran to the house where the dead body lay, and carried it (as asanctified body) into the great Church, where people, halt, lame,and blind, or troubled with any other diseases, were brought about it,even as if every one should forth-with be holpen, onely by theirtouching the body.

  • 蓝宏徳 08-03

    {  Understand then (Gracious hearers) that in Bologna, a very famousCity of Lombardicy there lived sometime a Knight, most highlyrespected for his vertues, named Signior Gentile de Carisendi, who (inhis yonger dayes) was enamoured of a Gentlewoman, called MadamCatharina, the Wife of Signior Nicoluccio Caccianimico. And becauseduring the time of his amourous pursuite, he found but a sorryenterchange of affection from the Lady; hee went (as hopelesse ofany successe) to be Potestate of Modena, whereto he was called byplace and order.

  • 金璧辉 08-02

      Having found out the place where she dwelt, he began (as it is thecustome of yong Lovers) to use divers daily walkes by her doore: asthinking in his minde, that her remembrance of him was constantlycontinued, as his was most intirely fixed on her. But the case wasvery strangely altred, because she was now growne no more mindfullof him, then if she had never seene him before. Or if she did anyway remember him, it appeared to be so little, that manifest signesdeclared the contrary. Which Jeronimo very quickely perceived,albeit not without many melancholly perturbations. Notwithstanding, helaboured by all possible meanes, to recover her former kindnesseagaine: but finding all his paines frivolously employed; he resolvedto dye, and yet to compasse some speech with her before.}

  • 丹尼尔·普林斯 08-02

      Thou canst (thou powerfull God of Love) perceive,

  • 华琛 08-02

      Having acquainted his Father with this determination, he concludedwith him, to have that from him in a moment which might supply hiswants because he would be clothed gallantly, and mounted honourably.And seeking for a servant necessary to attend on him, it chancedthat Fortarigo hearing thereof, came presently to Aniolliero,intreating him in the best manner he could, to let him waite on him ashis serving man, promising both dutiful and diligent attendance: yetnot to deaund any other wages, but onely payment of his ordinaryexpences. Aniolliero made him answere, that he durst not give himentertainment, not in regard of his insufficiency, and unaptnessefor service: but because he was a great Gamester, and divers timeswould be beastly drunke? whereto Fortarigo replyed that hee wouldrefraine from both those foule vices, and addict all his endeavorwholly to please him, without just taxation of any grosse errour;making such solemne vowes and protestations beside, as conqueredAniolliero, and won his consent.

  • 詹正洪 08-01

       A goodly chaire being brought him, in very humble maner hedemanded of her, what had become of her in so long a time, becauseit was verily beleeved throughout all Egypt, that she was drowned inthe Sea. I would it had bin so, answered the Lady, rather then toleade such a life as I have done; and I thinke my Father himselfewould wish it so, if ever he should come to the knowledge thereof.With these words the teares rained downe her faire cheekes:wherefore Antigonus thus spake unto hir. Madam, discomfort not yourselfe before you have occasion; but (if you be so pleased) relate yourpassed accidents to me, and what the course of your life hath bene:perhaps, I shall give you such friendly advice as may stand youinsted, and no way be injurious to you.

  • 李丽云 07-30

    {  The amourous Friend to Helena, who stood by all this while, laughingat the Schollers hard usage, returned up againe with her to herChamber, where they could not take a jote of rest, for flouting andscorning the betrayed Scholler, As for him poore man, hee was becomelike the Swanne, coldly chattering his teeth together, in a strangenew kinde of harmony to him. And perceiving himselfe to be meerelymocked, he attempted to get open the doore, or how he might passeforth at any other place; but being no way able to compasse it, hewalked up and downe like an angry Lyon, cursing the hard quality ofthe time, the discourtesie of the Lady, the over-tedious length of thenight; but (most of all) his owne folly and simplicity, in being sobasely abused and gulde. Now began the heat of his former affection toHelena, altered into as violent a detestation of her; Yea, extremityof hatred in the highest degree; beating his braines, and ransackingevery corner of in. vention, by what meanes he might best berevenged on her, which now he more earnestly desired to effect, thento enjoy the benefit of her love, or to be embraced betweene herarmes.

  • 周浩文 07-30

      At his departure, he commanded them that had the charge of thisexecution, to proceede no further, untill they heard more from theKing, to whom he gallopped immediately, and although he beheld himto bee very angerly moved; yet he spared not to speake in thismaner. Sir, wherin have those poore young couple offended you, thatare so shamefully to be burnt at Palermo? The King told him: wheretothe Admirall (pursuing still his purpose) thus replyed. Beleeve meSir, if true love be an offence, then theirs may be termed to beone; and albeit it deserved death, yet farre be it from thee toinflict it on them: for as faults doe justly require punishment, sodoe good turnes as equally merit grace and requitall. Knowest thouwhat and who they are, whom thou hast so dishonourably condemned tothe fire? Not I, quoth the King. Why then I will tell thee, answeredthe Admirall, that thou mayest take the better knowledge of them,and forbeare hereafter, to be so over violently transported withanger.

提交评论