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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:吉马 大小:FjRBHlgq23576KB 下载:chMoG2RA84111次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:XJUWQFMS97243条
日期:2020-08-05 18:35:27
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  On either side there stood gold and silver mastiffs which Vulcan,with his consummate skill, had fashioned expressly to keep watchover the palace of king Alcinous; so they were immortal and couldnever grow old. Seats were ranged all along the wall, here and therefrom one end to the other, with coverings of fine woven work which thewomen of the house had made. Here the chief persons of the Phaeciansused to sit and eat and drink, for there was abundance at all seasons;and there were golden figures of young men with lighted torches intheir hands, raised on pedestals, to give light by night to thosewho were at table. There are fifty maid servants in the house, some ofwhom are always grinding rich yellow grain at the mill, while otherswork at the loom, or sit and spin, and their shuttles go, backwardsand forwards like the fluttering of aspen leaves, while the linen isso closely woven that it will turn oil. As the Phaecians are thebest sailors in the world, so their women excel all others in weaving,for Minerva has taught them all manner of useful arts, and they arevery intelligent.
2.  "What do you mean, Telemachus," replied Antinous, "by thisswaggering talk? If all the suitors were to give him as much as Iwill, he would not come here again for another three months."
3.  Eurymachus was furious at all this. He scowled at him and cried,"You wretch, I will soon pay you out for daring to say such thingsto me, and in public too. Has the wine been getting into your heador do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lost your witsbecause you beat the tramp Irus. With this he caught hold of afootstool, but Ulysses sought protection at the knees of Amphinomus ofDulichium, for he was afraid. The stool hit the cupbearer on his righthand and knocked him down: the man fell with a cry flat on his back,and his wine-jug fell ringing to the ground. The suitors in thecovered cloister were now in an uproar, and one would turn towards hisneighbour, saying, "I wish the stranger had gone somewhere else, badluck to hide, for all the trouble he gives us. We cannot permit suchdisturbance about a beggar; if such ill counsels are to prevail weshall have no more pleasure at our banquet."
4.  "There it was that I heard news of Ulysses, for the king told mehe had entertained him, and shown him much hospitality while he was onhis homeward journey. He showed me also the treasure of gold, andwrought iron that Ulysses had got together. There was enough to keephis family for ten generations, so much had he left in the house ofking Pheidon. But the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the god's high oak tree, and know whetherafter so long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly, or insecret. Moreover the king swore in my presence, making drink-offeringsin his own house as he did so, that the ship was by the water side,and the crew found, that should take him to his own country. He sentme off however before Ulysses returned, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,and he told those in charge of her to be sure and take me safely toKing Acastus.
5.  Thus, then, the ship sped on her way through the watches of thenight from dark till dawn.
6.  "But why," said Ulysses, "did you not tell him, for you knew allabout it? Did you want him too to go sailing about amid all kinds ofhardship while others are eating up his estate?"

计划指导

1.  This was how they talked. But Telemachus went down into the loftyand spacious store-room where his father's treasure of gold and bronzelay heaped up upon the floor, and where the linen and spare clotheswere kept in open chests. Here, too, there was a store of fragrantolive oil, while casks of old, well-ripened wine, unblended and fitfor a god to drink, were ranged against the wall in case Ulyssesshould come home again after all. The room was closed with well-madedoors opening in the middle; moreover the faithful old house-keeperEuryclea, daughter of Ops the son of Pisenor, was in charge ofeverything both night and day. Telemachus called her to the store-roomand said:
2.  "Then I saw Phaedra, and Procris, and fair Ariadne daughter of themagician Minos, whom Theseus was carrying off from Crete to Athens,but he did not enjoy her, for before he could do so Diana killed herin the island of Dia on account of what Bacchus had said against her.
3.  "Thus did he pray, and Neptune heard his prayer. Then he picked up arock much larger than the first, swung it aloft and hurled it withprodigious force. It fell just short of the ship, but was within alittle of hitting the end of the rudder. The sea quaked as the rockfell into it, and the wash of the wave it raised drove us onwards onour way towards the shore of the island.
4.  "Thus, then, did we sit and hold sad talk with one another, I on theone side of the trench with my sword held over the blood, and theghost of my comrade saying all this to me from the other side. Thencame the ghost of my dead mother Anticlea, daughter to Autolycus. Ihad left her alive when I set out for Troy and was moved to tears whenI saw her, but even so, for all my sorrow I would not let her comenear the blood till I had asked my questions of Teiresias.
5.  The Phaeacians then began talking among themselves, and one wouldturn towards his neighbour, saying, "Bless my heart, who is it thatcan have rooted the ship in the sea just as she was getting into port?We could see the whole of her only moment ago."
6.  Then Pisistratus said, "Menelaus, son of Atreus, you are right inthinking that this young man is Telemachus, but he is very modest, andis ashamed to come here and begin opening up discourse with onewhose conversation is so divinely interesting as your own. Myfather, Nestor, sent me to escort him hither, for he wanted to knowwhether you could give him any counsel or suggestion. A son has alwaystrouble at home when his father has gone away leaving him withoutsupporters; and this is how Telemachus is now placed, for his fatheris absent, and there is no one among his own people to stand by him."

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1.  "My mother," answered Telemachus, tells me I am son to Ulysses,but it is a wise child that knows his own father. Would that I wereson to one who had grown old upon his own estates, for, since youask me, there is no more ill-starred man under heaven than he who theytell me is my father."
2.  But Minerva resolved to help Ulysses, so she bound the ways of allthe winds except one, and made them lie quite still; but she rouseda good stiff breeze from the North that should lay the waters tillUlysses reached the land of the Phaeacians where he would be safe.
3.  "Their hearts sank as they heard me, for they remembered how theyhad been treated by the Laestrygonian Antiphates, and by the savageogre Polyphemus. They wept bitterly in their dismay, but there wasnothing to be got by crying, so I divided them into two companiesand set a captain over each; I gave one company to Eurylochus, while Itook command of the other myself. Then we cast lots in a helmet, andthe lot fell upon Eurylochus; so he set out with his twenty-two men,and they wept, as also did we who were left behind.
4.  BOOK XX.
5.   And Ulysses answered, "I will tell you all about it. If there weremeat and wine enough, and we could stay here in the hut with nothingto do but to eat and drink while the others go to their work, Icould easily talk on for a whole twelve months without everfinishing the story of the sorrows with which it has pleased heaven tovisit me.
6.  "Menelaus, son of Atreus, and you my good friends, sons ofhonourable men (which is as Jove wills, for he is the giver both ofgood and evil, and can do what he chooses), feast here as you will,and listen while I tell you a tale in season. I cannot indeed nameevery single one of the exploits of Ulysses, but I can say what he didwhen he was before Troy, and you Achaeans were in all sorts ofdifficulties. He covered himself with wounds and bruises, dressedhimself all in rags, and entered the enemy's city looking like amenial or a beggar. and quite different from what he did when he wasamong his own people. In this disguise he entered the city of Troy,and no one said anything to him. I alone recognized him and began toquestion him, but he was too cunning for me. When, however, I hadwashed and anointed him and had given him clothes, and after I hadsworn a solemn oath not to betray him to the Trojans till he had gotsafely back to his own camp and to the ships, he told me all thatthe Achaeans meant to do. He killed many Trojans and got muchinformation before he reached the Argive camp, for all which thingsthe Trojan women made lamentation, but for my own part I was glad, formy heart was beginning to oam after my home, and I was unhappy aboutwrong that Venus had done me in taking me over there, away from mycountry, my girl, and my lawful wedded husband, who is indeed by nomeans deficient either in person or understanding."

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1.  "These men hatched a plot against me that would have reduced me tothe very extreme of misery, for when the ship had got some way outfrom land they resolved on selling me as a slave. They stripped meof the shirt and cloak that I was wearing, and gave me instead thetattered old clouts in which you now see me; then, towardsnightfall, they reached the tilled lands of Ithaca, and there theybound me with a strong rope fast in the ship, while they went on shoreto get supper by the sea side. But the gods soon undid my bonds forme, and having drawn my rags over my head I slid down the rudderinto the sea, where I struck out and swam till I was well clear ofthem, and came ashore near a thick wood in which I lay concealed. Theywere very angry at my having escaped and went searching about forme, till at last they thought it was no further use and went back totheir ship. The gods, having hidden me thus easily, then took me toa good man's door- for it seems that I am not to die yet awhile."
2.  "Then," said Penelope, "if you are a god or have been sent here bydivine commission, tell me also about that other unhappy one- is hestill alive, or is he already dead and in the house of Hades?"
3.  Pontonous mixed the wine and handed it to every one in turn; theothers each from his own seat made a drink-offering to the blessedgods that live in heaven, but Ulysses rose and placed the double cupin the hands of queen Arete.
4、  BOOK XVI.
5、  While he was thus in two minds, Neptune sent a terrible great wavethat seemed to rear itself above his head till it broke right over theraft, which then went to pieces as though it were a heap of drychaff tossed about by a whirlwind. Ulysses got astride of one plankand rode upon it as if he were on horseback; he then took off theclothes Calypso had given him, bound Ino's veil under his arms, andplunged into the sea- meaning to swim on shore. King Neptune watchedhim as he did so, and wagged his head, muttering to himself andsaying, "'There now, swim up and down as you best can till you fall inwith well-to-do people. I do not think you will be able to say thatI have let you off too lightly." On this he lashed his horses anddrove to Aegae where his palace is.

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  • 谢进发 08-04

      "Thus did she speak and we assented. We stayed with Circe for awhole twelvemonth feasting upon an untold quantity both of meat andwine. But when the year had passed in the waning of moons and the longdays had come round, my men called me apart and said, 'Sir, it is timeyou began to think about going home, if so be you are to be sparedto see your house and native country at all.'

  • 尹汤云 08-04

      To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Stranger, though a stillpoorer man should come here, it would not be right for me to insulthim, for all strangers and beggars are from Jove. You must take whatyou can get and be thankful, for servants live in fear when theyhave young lords for their masters; and this is my misfortune now, forheaven has hindered the return of him who would have been alwaysgood to me and given me something of my own- a house, a piece of land,a good looking wife, and all else that a liberal master allows aservant who has worked hard for him, and whose labour the gods haveprospered as they have mine in the situation which I hold. If mymaster had grown old here he would have done great things by me, buthe is gone, and I wish that Helen's whole race were utterly destroyed,for she has been the death of many a good man. It was this matter thattook my master to Ilius, the land of noble steeds, to fight theTrojans in the cause of kin Agamemnon."

  • 贾思勰 08-04

       BOOK II.

  • 西摩尔 08-04

      To this Telemachus answered, "By Jove, Agelaus, and by the sorrowsof my unhappy father, who has either perished far from Ithaca, or iswandering in some distant land, I throw no obstacles in the way ofmy mother's marriage; on the contrary I urge her to choosewhomsoever she will, and I will give her numberless gifts into thebargain, but I dare not insist point blank that she shall leave thehouse against her own wishes. Heaven forbid that I should do this."

  • 姜晓冲 08-03

    {  "'Ulysses,' said I, 'this cold will be the death of me, for I haveno cloak; some god fooled me into setting off with nothing on but myshirt, and I do not know what to do.'

  • 王馨 08-02

      "Stranger," said she, "rise and let us be going back to the town;I will introduce you at the house of my excellent father, where Ican tell you that you will meet all the best people among thePhaecians. But be sure and do as I bid you, for you seem to be asensible person. As long as we are going past the fields- and farmlands, follow briskly behind the waggon along with the maids and Iwill lead the way myself. Presently, however, we shall come to thetown, where you will find a high wall running all round it, and a goodharbour on either side with a narrow entrance into the city, and theships will be drawn up by the road side, for every one has a placewhere his own ship can lie. You will see the market place with atemple of Neptune in the middle of it, and paved with large stonesbedded in the earth. Here people deal in ship's gear of all kinds,such as cables and sails, and here, too, are the places where oars aremade, for the Phaeacians are not a nation of archers; they knownothing about bows and arrows, but are a sea-faring folk, and pridethemselves on their masts, oars, and ships, with which they travel farover the sea.}

  • 王颀 08-02

      Telemachus answered, "Antinous, how can I drive the mother whobore me from my father's house? My father is abroad and we do not knowwhether he is alive or dead. It will be hard on me if I have to payIcarius the large sum which I must give him if I insist on sending hisdaughter back to him. Not only will he deal rigorously with me, butheaven will also punish me; for my mother when she leaves the housewill calf on the Erinyes to avenge her; besides, it would not be acreditable thing to do, and I will have nothing to say to it. If youchoose to take offence at this, leave the house and feast elsewhere atone another's houses at your own cost turn and turn about. If, onthe other hand, you elect to persist in spunging upon one man,heaven help me, but Jove shall reckon with you in full, and when youfall in my father's house there shall be no man to avenge you."

  • 李建国 08-02

      With these words he girded the sword about his shoulders and towardssundown the presents began to make their appearance, as the servantsof the donors kept bringing them to the house of King Alcinous; herehis sons received them, and placed them under their mother's charge.Then Alcinous led the way to the house and bade his guests taketheir seats.

  • 王少薇 08-01

       To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "My son, I will tellyou the real truth. He says he is a Cretan, and that he has been agreat traveller. At this moment he is running away from aThesprotian ship, and has refuge at my station, so I will put him intoyour hands. Do whatever you like with him, only remember that he isyour suppliant."

  • 陈昌 07-30

    {  "Eumaeus, and all of you, to-morrow I want to go away and beginbegging about the town, so as to be no more trouble to you or toyour men. Give me your advice therefore, and let me have a goodguide to go with me and show me the way. I will go the round of thecity begging as I needs must, to see if any one will give me a drinkand a piece of bread. I should like also to go to the house of Ulyssesand bring news of her husband to queen Penelope. I could then go aboutamong the suitors and see if out of all their abundance they will giveme a dinner. I should soon make them an excellent servant in all sortsof ways. Listen and believe when I tell you that by the blessing ofMercury who gives grace and good name to the works of all men, thereis no one living who would make a more handy servant than I should- toput fresh wood on the fire, chop fuel, carve, cook, pour out wine, anddo all those services that poor men have to do for their betters."

  • 刘驰 07-30

      "That night we rested and nursed our anger, for Jove was hatchingmischief against us. But in the morning some of us drew our ships intothe water and put our goods with our women on board, while the rest,about half in number, stayed behind with Agamemnon. We- the otherhalf- embarked and sailed; and the ships went well, for heaven hadsmoothed the sea. When we reached Tenedos we offered sacrifices to thegods, for we were longing to get home; cruel Jove, however, did notyet mean that we should do so, and raised a second quarrel in thecourse of which some among us turned their ships back again, andsailed away under Ulysses to make their peace with Agamemnon; but I,and all the ships that were with me pressed forward, for I saw thatmischief was brewing. The son of Tydeus went on also with me, andhis crews with him. Later on Menelaus joined us at Lesbos, and foundus making up our minds about our course- for we did not know whetherto go outside Chios by the island of Psyra, keeping this to ourleft, or inside Chios, over against the stormy headland of Mimas. Sowe asked heaven for a sign, and were shown one to the effect that weshould be soonest out of danger if we headed our ships across the opensea to Euboea. This we therefore did, and a fair wind sprang upwhich gave us a quick passage during the night to Geraestus, wherewe offered many sacrifices to Neptune for having helped us so far onour way. Four days later Diomed and his men stationed their ships inArgos, but I held on for Pylos, and the wind never fell light from theday when heaven first made it fair for me.

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