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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:孙五湖 大小:9SN4mTmg69610KB 下载:wXTROM5l75231次
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日期:2020-08-05 12:56:06
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Alas," he cried to himself in his dismay, "what ever will become ofme, and how is it all to end? If I stay here upon the river bedthrough the long watches of the night, I am so exhausted that thebitter cold and damp may make an end of me- for towards sunrisethere will be a keen wind blowing from off the river. If, on the otherhand, I climb the hill side, find shelter in the woods, and sleep insome thicket, I may escape the cold and have a good night's rest,but some savage beast may take advantage of me and devour me."
2.  "'When you shall have thus besought the ghosts with your prayers,offer them a ram and a black ewe, bending their heads towardsErebus; but yourself turn away from them as though you would maketowards the river. On this, many dead men's ghosts will come to you,and you must tell your men to skin the two sheep that you have justkilled, and offer them as a burnt sacrifice with prayers to Hadesand to Proserpine. Then draw your sword and sit there, so as toprevent any other poor ghost from coming near the split blood beforeTeiresias shall have answered your questions. The seer willpresently come to you, and will tell you about your voyage- whatstages you are to make, and how you are to sail the see so as to reachyour home.'
3.  "'The third man,' he answered, 'is Ulysses who dwells in Ithaca. Ican see him in an island sorrowing bitterly in the house of thenymph Calypso, who is keeping him prisoner, and he cannot reach hishome for he has no ships nor sailors to take him over the sea. Asfor your own end, Menelaus, you shall not die in Argos, but the godswill take you to the Elysian plain, which is at the ends of the world.There fair-haired Rhadamanthus reigns, and men lead an easier lifethan any where else in the world, for in Elysium there falls not rain,nor hail, nor snow, but Oceanus breathes ever with a West wind thatsings softly from the sea, and gives fresh life to all men. Thiswill happen to you because you have married Helen, and are Jove'sson-in-law.'
4.  "Then we entered the Straits in great fear of mind, for on the onehand was Scylla, and on the other dread Charybdis kept sucking upthe salt water. As she vomited it up, it was like the water in acauldron when it is boiling over upon a great fire, and the sprayreached the top of the rocks on either side. When she began to suckagain, we could see the water all inside whirling round and round, andit made a deafening sound as it broke against the rocks. We couldsee the bottom of the whirlpool all black with sand and mud, and themen were at their wit's ends for fear. While we were taken up withthis, and were expecting each moment to be our last, Scylla pounceddown suddenly upon us and snatched up my six best men. I was lookingat once after both ship and men, and in a moment I saw their hands andfeet ever so high above me, struggling in the air as Scylla wascarrying them off, and I heard them call out my name in one lastdespairing cry. As a fisherman, seated, spear in hand, upon somejutting rock throws bait into the water to deceive the poor littlefishes, and spears them with the ox's horn with which his spear isshod, throwing them gasping on to the land as he catches them one byone- even so did Scylla land these panting creatures on her rock andmunch them up at the mouth of her den, while they screamed andstretched out their hands to me in their mortal agony. This was themost sickening sight that I saw throughout all my voyages.
5.  "I heard of Ithaca," said he, "when I was in Crete beyond theseas, and now it seems I have reached it with all these treasures. Ihave left as much more behind me for my children, but am flyingbecause I killed Orsilochus son of Idomeneus, the fleetest runner inCrete. I killed him because he wanted to rob me of the spoils I hadgot from Troy with so much trouble and danger both on the field ofbattle and by the waves of the weary sea; he said I had not served hisfather loyally at Troy as vassal, but had set myself up as anindependent ruler, so I lay in wait for him and with one of myfollowers by the road side, and speared him as he was coming into townfrom the country. my It was a very dark night and nobody saw us; itwas not known, therefore, that I had killed him, but as soon as Ihad done so I went to a ship and besought the owners, who werePhoenicians, to take me on board and set me in Pylos or in Eliswhere the Epeans rule, giving them as much spoil as satisfied them.They meant no guile, but the wind drove them off their course, andwe sailed on till we came hither by night. It was all we could do toget inside the harbour, and none of us said a word about supper thoughwe wanted it badly, but we all went on shore and lay down just as wewere. I was very tired and fell asleep directly, so they took my goodsout of the ship, and placed them beside me where I was lying uponthe sand. Then they sailed away to Sidonia, and I was left here ingreat distress of mind."
6.  Thereon he floated about for two nights and two days in the water,with a heavy swell on the sea and death staring him in the face; butwhen the third day broke, the wind fell and there was a dead calmwithout so much as a breath of air stirring. As he rose on the swellhe looked eagerly ahead, and could see land quite near. Then, aschildren rejoice when their dear father begins to get better afterhaving for a long time borne sore affliction sent him by some angryspirit, but the gods deliver him from evil, so was Ulysses thankfulwhen he again saw land and trees, and swam on with all his strengththat he might once more set foot upon dry ground. When, however, hegot within earshot, he began to hear the surf thundering up againstthe rocks, for the swell still broke against them with a terrificroar. Everything was enveloped in spray; there were no harbourswhere a ship might ride, nor shelter of any kind, but onlyheadlands, low-lying rocks, and mountain tops.

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1.  "My friend," replied Ulysses, "you are very positive, and veryhard of belief about your master's coming home again, nevertheless Iwill not merely say, but will swear, that he is coming. Do not give meanything for my news till he has actually come, you may then give me ashirt and cloak of good wear if you will. I am in great want, but Iwill not take anything at all till then, for I hate a man, even as Ihate hell fire, who lets his poverty tempt him into lying. I swearby king Jove, by the rites of hospitality, and by that hearth ofUlysses to which I have now come, that all will surely happen as Ihave said it will. Ulysses will return in this self same year; withthe end of this moon and the beginning of the next he will be hereto do vengeance on all those who are ill treating his wife and son."
2.  Thus did he speak, and they went on board even as he had said. Butas Telemachus was thus busied, praying also and sacrificing to Minervain the ship's stern, there came to him a man from a distant country, aseer, who was flying from Argos because he had killed a man. He wasdescended from Melampus, who used to live in Pylos, the land of sheep;he was rich and owned a great house, but he was driven into exile bythe great and powerful king Neleus. Neleus seized his goods and heldthem for a whole year, during which he was a close prisoner in thehouse of king Phylacus, and in much distress of mind both on accountof the daughter of Neleus and because he was haunted by a great sorrowthat dread Erinyes had laid upon him. In the end, however, heescaped with his life, drove the cattle from Phylace to Pylos, avengedthe wrong that had been done him, and gave the daughter of Neleus tohis brother. Then he left the country and went to Argos, where itwas ordained that he should reign over much people. There hemarried, established himself, and had two famous sons Antiphates andMantius. Antiphates became father of Oicleus, and Oicleus ofAmphiaraus, who was dearly loved both by Jove and by Apollo, but hedid not live to old age, for he was killed in Thebes by reason of awoman's gifts. His sons were Alcmaeon and Amphilochus. Mantius, theother son of Melampus, was father to Polypheides and Cleitus.Aurora, throned in gold, carried off Cleitus for his beauty's sake,that he might dwell among the immortals, but Apollo made Polypheidesthe greatest seer in the whole world now that Amphiaraus was dead.He quarrelled with his father and went to live in Hyperesia, wherehe remained and prophesied for all men.
3.  Then Telemachus went out of the court to the place where theAchaeans were meeting in assembly; he had his spear in his hand, andhe was not alone, for his two dogs went with him. But Eurycleacalled the maids and said, "Come, wake up; set about sweeping thecloisters and sprinkling them with water to lay the dust; put thecovers on the seats; wipe down the tables, some of you, with a wetsponge; clean out the mixing-jugs and the cups, and for water from thefountain at once; the suitors will be here directly; they will be hereearly, for it is a feast day."
4.  "Thus did they speak and I assented. Thereon through the livelongday to the going down of the sun we feasted our fill on meat and wine,but when the sun went down and it came on dark the men laid themselvesdown to sleep in the covered cloisters. I, however, after I had gotinto bed with Circe, besought her by her knees, and the goddesslistened to what I had got to say. 'Circe,' said I, 'please to keepthe promise you made me about furthering me on my homeward voyage. Iwant to get back and so do my men, they are always pestering me withtheir complaints as soon as ever your back is turned.'
5.  "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."
6.  As he spoke he girded on his armour. Then he roused Telemachus,Philoetius, and Eumaeus, and told them all to put on their armouralso. This they did, and armed themselves. When they had done so, theyopened the gates and sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way. It wasnow daylight, but Minerva nevertheless concealed them in darknessand led them quickly out of the town.

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1.  "'Stay where you are, then, 'answered I, 'eating and drinking at theship, but I must go, for I am most urgently bound to do so.'
2.  Ulysses answered, "I hope you may be as dear to the gods as youare to me, for having saved me from going about and getting intotrouble; there is nothing worse than being always ways on the tramp;still, when men have once got low down in the world they will gothrough a great deal on behalf of their miserable bellies. Sincehowever you press me to stay here and await the return ofTelemachus, tell about Ulysses' mother, and his father whom he left onthe threshold of old age when he set out for Troy. Are they stillliving or are they already dead and in the house of Hades?"
3.  "Poor wretch," said she, "are you gone clean out of your mind? Goand sleep in some smithy, or place of public gossips, instead ofchattering here. Are you not ashamed of opening your mouth before yourbetters- so many of them too? Has the wine been getting into yourhead, or do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lostyour wits because you beat the tramp Irus; take care that a better manthan he does not come and cudgel you about the head till he pack youbleeding out of the house."
4.  Such was his story, but Minerva smiled and caressed him with herhand. Then she took the form of a woman, fair, stately, and wise,"He must be indeed a shifty lying fellow," said she, "who couldsurpass you in all manner of craft even though you had a god foryour antagonist. Dare-devil that you are, full of guile, unwearying indeceit, can you not drop your tricks and your instinctive falsehood,even now that you are in your own country again? We will say nomore, however, about this, for we can both of us deceive uponoccasion- you are the most accomplished counsellor and orator amongall mankind, while I for diplomacy and subtlety have no equal amongthe gods. Did you not know Jove's daughter Minerva- me, who havebeen ever with you, who kept watch over you in all your troubles,and who made the Phaeacians take so great a liking to you? And now,again, I am come here to talk things over with you, and help you tohide the treasure I made the Phaeacians give you; I want to tell youabout the troubles that await you in your own house; you have got toface them, but tell no one, neither man nor woman, that you havecome home again. Bear everything, and put up with every man'sinsolence, without a word."
5.   Therewith she went down into the cave to look for the safesthiding places, while Ulysses brought up all the treasure of gold,bronze, and good clothing which the Phaecians had given him. Theystowed everything carefully away, and Minerva set a stone againstthe door of the cave. Then the two sat down by the root of the greatolive, and consulted how to compass the destruction of the wickedsuitors.
6.  "The men were in despair at this, and Eurylochus at once gave mean insolent answer. 'Ulysses,' said he, 'you are cruel; you are verystrong yourself and never get worn out; you seem to be made of iron,and now, though your men are exhausted with toil and want of sleep,you will not let them land and cook themselves a good supper upon thisisland, but bid them put out to sea and go faring fruitlessly onthrough the watches of the flying night. It is by night that the windsblow hardest and do so much damage; how can we escape should one ofthose sudden squalls spring up from South West or West, which so oftenwreck a vessel when our lords the gods are unpropitious? Now,therefore, let us obey the of night and prepare our supper here hardby the ship; to-morrow morning we will go on board again and put outto sea.'

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1.  To this Penelope replied, "Eurymachus, heaven robbed me of all mybeauty whether of face or figure when the Argives set sail for Troyand my dear husband with them. If he were to return and look aftermy affairs, I should both be more respected and show a better presenceto the world. As it is, I am oppressed with care, and with theafflictions which heaven has seen fit to heap upon me. My husbandforesaw it all, and when he was leaving home he took my right wrist inhis hand- 'Wife, 'he said, 'we shall not all of us come safe homefrom Troy, for the Trojans fight well both with bow and spear. Theyare excellent also at fighting from chariots, and nothing decidesthe issue of a fight sooner than this. I know not, therefore,whether heaven will send me back to you, or whether I may not fallover there at Troy. In the meantime do you look after things here.Take care of my father and mother as at present, and even more soduring my absence, but when you see our son growing a beard, thenmarry whom you will, and leave this your present home. This is what hesaid and now it is all coming true. A night will come when I shallhave to yield myself to a marriage which I detest, for Jove hastaken from me all hope of happiness. This further grief, moreover,cuts me to the very heart. You suitors are not wooing me after thecustom of my country. When men are courting a woman who they thinkwill be a good wife to them and who is of noble birth, and when theyare each trying to win her for himself, they usually bring oxen andsheep to feast the friends of the lady, and they make hermagnificent presents, instead of eating up other people's propertywithout paying for it."
2.  "Thus he spoke, and the Achaeans feared no more. The daughters ofthe old man of the sea stood round you weeping bitterly, and clothedyou in immortal raiment. The nine muses also came and lifted uptheir sweet voices in lament- calling and answering one another; therewas not an Argive but wept for pity of the dirge they chaunted. Daysand nights seven and ten we mourned you, mortals and immortals, but onthe eighteenth day we gave you to the flames, and many a fat sheepwith many an ox did we slay in sacrifice around you. You were burnt inraiment of the gods, with rich resins and with honey, while heroes,horse and foot, clashed their armour round the pile as you wereburning, with the tramp as of a great multitude. But when the flamesof heaven had done their work, we gathered your white bones atdaybreak and laid them in ointments and in pure wine. Your motherbrought us a golden vase to hold them- gift of Bacchus, and work ofVulcan himself; in this we mingled your bleached bones with those ofPatroclus who had gone before you, and separate we enclosed also thoseof Antilochus, who had been closer to you than any other of yourcomrades now that Patroclus was no more.
3.  "To this he gave me but a pitiless answer, 'Stranger,' said he, 'youare a fool, or else you know nothing of this country. Talk to me,indeed, about fearing the gods or shunning their anger? We Cyclopes donot care about Jove or any of your blessed gods, for we are ever somuch stronger than they. I shall not spare either yourself or yourcompanions out of any regard for Jove, unless I am in the humour fordoing so. And now tell me where you made your ship fast when youcame on shore. Was it round the point, or is she lying straight offthe land?'
4、  "Hush," answered Ulysses, "hold your peace and ask no questions, forthis is the manner of the gods. Get you to your bed, and leave me hereto talk with your mother and the maids. Your mother in her griefwill ask me all sorts of questions."
5、  "Your discretion, my friend," answered Menelaus, "is beyond youryears. It is plain you take after your father. One can soon see when aman is son to one whom heaven has blessed both as regards wife andoffspring- and it has blessed Nestor from first to last all hisdays, giving him a green old age in his own house, with sons about himwho are both we disposed and valiant. We will put an end thereforeto all this weeping, and attend to our supper again. Let water bepoured over our hands. Telemachus and I can talk with one anotherfully in the morning."

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  • 沈德鸿 08-04

      "On this he lifted up his hands to the firmament of heaven andprayed, saying, 'Hear me, great Neptune; if I am indeed your owntrue-begotten son, grant that Ulysses may never reach his homealive; or if he must get back to his friends at last, let him do solate and in sore plight after losing all his men [let him reach hishome in another man's ship and find trouble in his house.']

  • 王悦 08-04

      "'That,' said he, 'I can soon do Any ghost that you let taste of theblood will talk with you like a reasonable being, but if you do notlet them have any blood they will go away again.'

  • 董哲 08-04

       "'Ulysses,' he answered, 'noble son of Laertes, was not lost atsea in any storm of Neptune's raising, nor did my foes despatch meupon the mainland, but Aegisthus and my wicked wife were the deathof me between them. He asked me to his house, feasted me, and thenbutchered me most miserably as though I were a fat beast in aslaughter house, while all around me my comrades were slain like sheepor pigs for the wedding breakfast, or picnic, or gorgeous banquet ofsome great nobleman. You must have seen numbers of men killed eitherin a general engagement, or in single combat, but you never sawanything so truly pitiable as the way in which we fell in thatcloister, with the mixing-bowl and the loaded tables lying allabout, and the ground reeking with our-blood. I heard Priam's daughterCassandra scream as Clytemnestra killed her close beside me. I laydying upon the earth with the sword in my body, and raised my hands tokill the slut of a murderess, but she slipped away from me; shewould not even close my lips nor my eyes when I was dying, for thereis nothing in this world so cruel and so shameless as a woman when shehas fallen into such guilt as hers was. Fancy murdering her ownhusband! I thought I was going to be welcomed home by my childrenand my servants, but her abominable crime has brought disgrace onherself and all women who shall come after- even on the good ones.'

  • 李菲儿 08-04

      Thus spoke Antinous, but Telemachus heeded him not. Meanwhile theheralds were bringing the holy hecatomb through the city, and theAchaeans gathered under the shady grove of Apollo.

  • 董晓梅 08-03

    {  Now there was a trap door on the wall, while at one end of thepavement there was an exit leading to a narrow passage, and thisexit was closed by a well-made door. Ulysses told Philoetius tostand by this door and guard it, for only one person could attack itat a time. But Agelaus shouted out, "Cannot some one go up to the trapdoor and tell the people what is going on? Help would come at once,and we should soon make an end of this man and his shooting."

  • 米切尔·雷诺斯 08-02

      "But Polyphemus shouted to them from inside the cave, 'Noman iskilling me by fraud! Noman is killing me by force!'}

  • 钟伟 08-02

      Then Ulysses said, "Sir, it is right that I should say somethingmyself. I am much shocked about what you have said about theinsolent way in which the suitors are behaving in despite of such aman as you are. Tell me, do you submit to such treatment tamely, orhas some god set your people against you? May you not complain of yourbrothers- for it is to these that a man may look for support,however great his quarrel may be? I wish I were as young as you areand in my present mind; if I were son to Ulysses, or, indeed,Ulysses himself, I would rather some one came and cut my head off, butI would go to the house and be the bane of every one of these men.If they were too many for me- I being single-handed- I would ratherdie fighting in my own house than see such disgraceful sights dayafter day, strangers grossly maltreated, and men dragging the womenservants about the house in an unseemly way, wine drawn recklessly,and bread wasted all to no purpose for an end that shall never beaccomplished."

  • 加里多 08-02

      "'You will now come to the Thrinacian island, and here you willsee many herds of cattle and flocks of sheep belonging to the sun-god-seven herds of cattle and seven flocks of sheep, with fifty head ineach flock. They do not breed, nor do they become fewer in number, andthey are tended by the goddesses Phaethusa and Lampetie, who arechildren of the sun-god Hyperion by Neaera. Their mother when shehad borne them and had done suckling them sent them to theThrinacian island, which was a long way off, to live there and lookafter their father's flocks and herds. If you leave these flocksunharmed, and think of nothing but getting home, you may yet aftermuch hardship reach Ithaca; but if you harm them, then I forewarnyou of the destruction both of your ship and of your comrades; andeven though you may yourself escape, you will return late, in badplight, after losing all your men.'

  • 吴永生 08-01

       On this Antinous began to abuse the swineherd. "You precious idiot,"he cried, "what have you brought this man to town for? Have we nottramps and beggars enough already to pester us as we sit at meat? Doyou think it a small thing that such people gather here to wasteyour master's property and must you needs bring this man as well?"

  • 秦华 07-30

    {  "What do you think of this man, O Phaecians? Is he not tall and goodlooking, and is he not Clever? True, he is my own guest, but all ofyou share in the distinction. Do not he a hurry to send him away,nor niggardly in the presents you make to one who is in such greatneed, for heaven has blessed all of you with great abundance."

  • 邹建华 07-30

      "Hear me," she cried, "Daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove,unweariable. If ever Ulysses while he was here burned you fat thighbones of sheep or heifer, bear it in mind now as in my favour, andsave my darling son from the villainy of the suitors."

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