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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:刘国光 大小:YmvIggHG36895KB 下载:AZYDOKgk78854次
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日期:2020-08-06 10:30:02
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Being come somewhat neere to the Gentlewomans house, and shestanding readie in the Window with her Maide, to see when Rinuccioshould arrive there with Alessandro, provided also of an apt excuse,to send them thence like a couple of Coxcombes; it fortuned, thatthe Watchmen, attending there in the same streete, for theapprehension of a banished man, stolne into the City contrarie toorder; hearing the trampling of Rinuccioes feete, directed theircourse as they heard the noise, having their Lanthorne and lightclosely covered, to see who it should be, and what he intended, andbeating their weapons against the ground, demanded, Who goes there?Rinuccio knowing their voyces, and that now was no time for any longdeliberation: let fall Alessandro, and ran away as fast as his legscould carry him.
2.  Master Doctor, you must be first of all, strongly armed withresolution and confidence: for, if you be not, you may not onlyreceyve hindrance, but also do us great harme beside: and now youshall heare, in what manner, and how you are to be bold andconstant. You must procure the meanes, this instant night, when allthe people are in their soundest sleepe, to stand upon one of thosehigh exalted Tombs or Monuments, which are in the churchyard ofSanta Maria Novella, with the very fairest gowne you have about you,because you may appeare in the more honorable condition, before theassembly seated together, and likewise to make good our speechesalready delivered of you, concerning your qualitie and profession:that the Countesse, perceyving you to bee a woorthie Gentleman, mayhave you first honoured with the Bathe, and afterward Knighted ather owne cost and charge. But you must continue stil upon the Tombe(dreadlesse of nightly apparitions and visions) untill such time as wesend for you.
3.  THE SONG
4.  This counsell pleased the King very highly, and he being a Prince ofgreat understanding, gave order to have it accordingly followed, andthereby valiantly vanquished his enemies. Heereupon, Martuccio came tobe great in his grace, as also consequently rich, and seated in nomeane place of authority. Now as worthy and commendable actions aresoone spread abroad, in honor of the man by whom they hapned: evenso the fame of this rare got victory, was quickly noysed throughoutthe Countrey, and came to the hearing of poore Constance, thatMartuccio Gomito (whom she supposed so long since to be dead) wasliving, and in honourable condition. The love which formerly shebare unto him, being not altogether extinct in her heart; of a smallsparke, brake forth into a sodaine flame, and so encreased day by day,that her hope (being before almost quite dead) revived againe inchearfull manner.
5.  Enricht with beautie, farre beyond all other:
6.  At the same time, Signior Nicoluccio being absent from Bologna,and his Lady at a Farme-house of his in the Countrey (about threemiles distant from the City) because she was great with child,; andsomewhat neere the time of her teeming: it came to passe, that somedangerous accident befell her, which was so powerfull in operation, asno signe of life appeared remained in her, but she was reputed (evenin the judgement of the best Phisitians, whereof she wanted noattendance) to be verily dead. And because in the opinion of herparents and neerest kinred, the time for her deliverance was yet sofarre off, as the Infant within her, wanted much of a perfectcreature: they made the lesse mourning; but in the next Church, asalso the vault belonging to her Ancestors, they gave her buriallvery speedily.

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1.  When the Father had given this cruell sentence, both against hisowne Daughter, and her young Sonne, the servant readier to do evill,then any good, went to the place where his Daughter was kept. Poorecondemned Pedro, (as you have heard) was led whipt to the Gibbet,and passing (as it pleased the Captaines Officers to guide him) by afaire Inne: at the same time were lodged there three chiefe persons ofArminia, whom the King of the Countrey had sent to Rome, asAmbassadours to the Popes Holinesse, to negociate about an importantbusinesse neerely concerning the King and State. Reposing there forsome few dayes, as being much wearied with their journey., andhighly honoured by the Gentlemen of Trapani, especially SigniorAmarigo; these Ambassadours standing in their Chamber window, heardthe wofull lamentations of Pedro in his passage by.
2.  But before occasions grew to this effect, the Emperour made aconfederacie with Bassano, King of Cappadocia, that hee should descendwith his forces, one way upon Osbech, and he would assault him withhis power on the other. But he could not so conveniently bring this topasse, because the Emperour would not yeeld to Bassano, in anyunreasonable matter he demanded. Neverthelesse, when hee understoodewhat had happened to his Sonne (for whom his greefe was beyond allmeasure) hee graunted the King of Cappadociaes request; soliciting himwith all instancy, to be the more speedy in assayling Osbech. It wasnot long, before hee heard of this conjuration made against him; andtherefore hee speedily mustered up all his forces, ere he would beencompassed by two such potent kings, and marched on to meete the Kingof Cappadocia, leaving his Ladie and Wife (for her safety) at Lajazzo,in the custodie of a true and loyall Servant of his.
3.  After he had made this sleepy water, he put it into a glasse,wherewith it was filled (almost) up to the brimme; and till the timecame when he should use it, hee set it in his owne Chamber-Window,never acquainting any one, to what purpose he had provided thewater, nor what was his reason of setting it there; when it drewtowards the evening, and he was returned home from his pacients, aMessenger brought him Letters from Malfy, concerning a greatconflict happening there betweene two Noble Families, wherein diverswere very dangerously wounded on either side, and without his speedyrepairing thither, it would prove to the losse of many lives.Hereupon, the cure of the mans leg must needs be prolonged, untillhe was returned backe againe, in regard that many of the woundedpersons were his worthy friends, and liberall bounty was there to beexpected, which made him presently go aboord a small Barke, andforthwith set away towards Malfy.
4.  Faire Constance of Liparis, fell in love with Martuccio Gomito:and hearing that he was dead, desperately she entred into a Barke,which being transported by the windes to Susa in Barbary, fromthence she went to Thunis, where she found him to be living. There shemade her selfe knowne to him, and he being in great authority, as aprivy Counsellor to the King: he married the saide Constance, andreturned richly home with Air, to the Island of Liparis.
5.  After he had laboured by all hopefull courses, to obtaine thatfavour of her, which he had formerly lost, without any offence in him,as his innocent soule truly witnessed with him, and saw that all hisfurther endeavours were fruitlesse and in vaine; he concluded toretreate himselfe from the World, and not to be any longer irkesome inher eye, that was the onely occasion of his unhappinesse. Hereupon,storing himselfe with summes of money, as suddenly he could collecttogether, secretly he departed from Florence, without speaking anyword to his friends or kindred; except one kinde companion ofhis, whom he acquainted with most of his secrets, and so travelledto Ancona, where he termed himselfe by the name of Sandoloscio.Repairing to a wealthy Merchant there, he placed himselfe as hisservant, and went in a Ship of his with him to Cyprus; his actions andbehaviour proved so pleasing to the Merchant, as not onely heallowed him very sufficient wages, but also grew into such associationwith him; as he gave the most of his affaires into his hands, which heguided with such honest and discreete care, that hee himselfe (infew yeeres compasse) proved to be a rich Merchant, and of famousreport.
6.  THE CHORUS SUNG BY ALL THE COMPANIE

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1.  Some part of the Jewells he gave to him, who had beene at costwith marriage feasting, and some to his the Abbot, beside a bountiebestowed on Monkes. Then he sent a messenger to Saladine, with Lettersof his whole successe, and confessing himselfe (for ever) hisobliged servant: living many yeeres (after) with his wife Adalietta,and using greater curtesies to strangers, then ever before he haddone.
2.  Then began hee to recount, the whole occasion of this straungeconflict in him, what a maine battaile hee had with his privatethoughts, confessing that they got the victory, causing him to diehourely for the love of Sophronia, and affirming withall, that indue acknowledgement, how greatly hee had transgressed against thelawes of friendship, he thought no other penance sufficient for him,but onely death, which he willingly expected every houre, and with allhis heart would gladly bid welcome.
3.  Now although Titus was confounded with shame, to yeeld consent, thatSophronia should be accepted as his wife, and used many obstinateresistances: yet notwithstanding, Love pleading on the one sidepowerfully, and Gisippus as earnestly perswading on the other, thus heanswered. Gisippus, I know not what to say, neither how to behave myselfe in this election, concerning the fitting of mine contentment, orpleasing thee in thy importunate perswasion. But seeing thy liberalityis so great, as it surmounteth all reason or shame in me, I will yeeldobedience to thy more then noble nature. Yet let this remaine forthine assurance, that I doe not receive this grace of thine, as aman not sufficiently understanding, how I enjoy from thee, not onelyher whom most of all I doe affect, but also doe hold my very life ofthee. Grant then you greatest Gods (if you be the Patrones of thismine unexpected felicitie) that with honor and due respect, I mayhereafter make apparantly knowne: how highly I acknowledge this thywonderfull favour, in being more mercifull to me, then I could be tomy selfe.
4.  You know noble Ladies, and you likewise most noble Gentlemen, thatto morrow is the day consecrated to the Passion of our blessed Lordand Saviour, which (if you have not forgotten it, as easily youcannot) we devoutly celebrated, Madame Neiphila being then Queene,ceasing from all our pleasant discoursing, as we did the like on theSaturday following, sanctifiing the sacred Sabboth, in due regard ofit selfe. Wherefore, being desirous to imitate precedent good example,which in worthy manner shee began to us all: I hold it very decent andnecessary, that we should abstaine to morrow, and the day ensuing,from recounting any of our pleasant Novels, reducing to ourmemories, what was done (as on those dayes) for the salvation of oursoules. This holy and Religious motion made by the Queene, wascommendably allowed by all the assembly, and therefore, humblytaking their leave of her, and an indifferent part of the nightbeing already spent; severally they betooke themselves to theirChambers.
5.   BY ANY HUMANE POWER OR PROVIDENCE; ASPECIALLY IN SUCH
6.  In this determination, wrapping a mantle about her head, and lyingdowne weeping in the boats bottome, she hourely expected her finallexpiration: but it fell out otherwise, and contrary to her desperateintention, because the wind turning to the North, and blowing verygently, without disturbing the Seas a jot, they conducted the smallBoat in such sort, that after the night of her entering into it, andthe morrowes sailing untill the evening, it came within an hundreleagues of Thunis and to a strond neere a Towne called Susa. The youngDamosell knew not whether she were on the sea or land; as one, who notby any accident hapning, lifted up her head to looke about her,neither intended ever to doe. Now it came to passe, that as theboate was driven to the shore, a poore woman stood at the Sea side,washing certaine Fishermens Nets; and seeing the boate comming towardsher under saile, without any person appearing in it, she wondredthereat not a little. It being close at the shore, and she thinkingthe Fishermen to be asleepe therein: stept boldly, and looked into theboate, where she saw not any body, but onely the poore distressedDamosell, whose sorrowes having brought her now into a sound sleepe,the woman gave many cals before she could awake her, which at thelength she did, and looked very strangely about her.

应用

1.  THE FIFT DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL
2.  Unto the place, which made me first to mourne.
3.  One of my other Consorts being by me, and perceiving in what anextreame agony I was; presently said unto me. My friend, what hastthou done more, then any of us here condemned with thee, that thoutremblest and quakest, being in so hot a fire? Oh my friend (quothI) I am in feare of a greater judgement then this, for a grievousoffence by mee heretofore committed while I lived. Then heedemaunded of mee what offence it was, whereto thus I answered. Itwas my chance in the other world, to be Godfather at a childsChristning, and afterward I grew so affectionate to the childs mother,as (indeed) I kissed her twice or thrise. My companyon laughing atme in mocking manner, replyed thus. Goe like an Asse as thou art,and be no more afraid hereafter, for here is no punishmentinflicted, in any kinde whatsoever, for such offences of frailtycommitted, especially with Gossips, as I my selfe can witnesse.
4、  MEANES ARE TO BE USED, FOR THEIR REDUCING TO GOODNESSE
5、  Magdalena, having acquainted her Husband with her vertuousintention, for preserving her Sisters life, and disappointing the Dukein his wicked desire; was as contrary to her true meaning in thiscase, as Ninetta had formerly beene adverse to Restagnone, onely beingover-ruled likewise by jealousie, and perswaded in his rash opinion,that the Duke had already dishonoured Magdalena, otherwise, he wouldnot have delivered Ninetta out of prison. Mad fury gave further fireto this unmanly perswasion, and nothing will now quench this but thelife of poore Magdalena, suddenly sacrificed in the rescue of herSister, such a divell is anger, when the understandings bright eyeis thereby abused. No credit might bee given to her womanlyprotestations, or any thing seeme to alter his bloody purpose; but,having slaine Magdalena with his Poniard (notwithstanding her tearesand humble entreaties) he ranne in haste to Ninettaes Chamber, she notdreaming on any such desperate accident, and to her he used thesedissembling speeches.

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  • 齐向龙 08-05

      It was the Will of Dioneus yesternight, that our discourses for thisday, should concerne the deceits of wives to their Husbands. Andwere it not to avoyde taxation, of a spleenitive desire to berevenged, like the dog being bitten, biteth againe: I could commandour to morrows conference, to touch mens treacheries towards theirwives. But because I am free from any such fiery humor, let it be yourgenerall consideration, to speake of such queint beguylings, as haveheretofore past, either of the woman to the man, the man to the woman,or of one man to another: and I am of opinion, that they will yeeld usno lesse delight, then those related (this day) have done. When shehad thus spoken, she rose; granting them all liberty, to goerecreate themselves untill Supper time.

  • 马库斯威廉姆斯 08-05

      The Tale delivered by Neiphila, maketh mee remember a doubtfullcase, which sometime hapned to another Jew. And because that God,and the truth of his holy Faith, hath bene already very welldiscoursed on: it shall not seeme unfitting (in my poore opinion) todescend now into the accidents of men. Wherefore, I will relate amatter unto you, which being attentively heard and considered; maymake you much more circumspect, in answering to divers questions anddemands, then (perhaps) otherwise you would be. Consider then (mostwoorthy assembly) that like as folly or dulnesse, many times hathoverthrowne some men from place of eminencie, into most great andgreevous miseries: even so, discreet sense and good understanding,hath delivered many out of irksome perils, and seated them in safestsecurity. And to prove it true, that folly hath made many fall fromhigh authority, into poore and despised calamity; may be avouched byinfinite examples, which now were needelesse to remember: But, thatgood sense and able understanding, may proove to be the occasion ofgreat desolation, without happy prevention, I will declare unto you invery few words, and make it good according to my promise.

  • 孙小美 08-05

       OR WIVES THAT ARE HIS SUBJECTS: YET HE OUGHT TO DENY AND REJECT

  • 王荷波 08-05

      THE FIRST DAY, THE SIXT NOVELL

  • 沈耀钦 08-04

    {  The Ladies and Gentlemen also, having smiled sufficiently at theseverall accidents which did befall the poore Traveller Andrea,reported at large by Madam Fiammetta, the Lady Aimillia seeing hertale to be fully concluded, began (by commandement of the Queene) tospeak in this manner.

  • 艾希提诺 08-03

      The Jew made answer, that he beleeved nothing to be so good andholy, as the Jewish Religion, and having beene borne therein, thereinalso he purposed to live and dye, no matter whatsoever being able toremove him from that resolution. For all this stiffe deniall,Jehannot would not so give him over; but pursued him still day byday, reitterating continually his former speeches to him: deliveringinfinite excellent and pregnant reasons, that Merchants themselveswere not ignorant, how farre the Christian faith excelled the Jewishfalshoods. And albeit the Jew was a very learned man in his owneLaw, yet notwithstanding the intire amity he bare to Jehannot, or(perhaps) his words fortified by the blessed Spirit, were soprevailant with him, that the Jew felt a pleasing apprehension inthem, though as yet his obstinacie stoode farre off from Conversion.But as he thus continued strong in opinion, so Jehannot lefte nothourely to labour him: insomuch, that the Jew being conquered bysuch earnest and continuall importunity, one day spake to Jehannot,saying.}

  • 余万刚 08-03

      When they heard this, they discoursed no further with theFlorentine, but pressed on mainely to the place where Martellinostood, crying out aloude. Lay hold on this Traytor, a mocker of God,and his holy Saints, that had no lamenesse in his limbes; but tomake a mocke of our Saint and us, came hither in false and counterfeitmanner. So laying hands uppon him, they threw him against theground, having him by the haire on his head, and tearing thegarments from his backe, spurning him with their feete, and beatinghim with their fists, that many were much ashamed to see it.

  • 高林 08-03

      I know (for my sake) thou hast given him thy goodly ambling Gelding,and so soone as he is gone, I promise thee upon my word, and by thefaithfull love I beare thee; that I will have further conferencewith thee, and let thee understand somewhat more of my minde. Andbecause this is neither fitting time nor place, to discourse onmatters of such serious moment: observe heereafter, as a signall, whenthou seest my Crimson Skarfe hanging in the window of my Chamber,which is upon the Garden side, that evening (so soone as it isnight) come to the Garden gate, with wary respect that no eye dodiscover thee, and there thou shalt finde me walking, and ready toacquaint thee with other matters, according as I shall finde occasion.

  • 平庆麟 08-02

       The Scholler, whose envious spleene was swolne very great, inremembring such a malicious cruelty exercised on him, beholding toweepe and make such lamentations; found a fierce conflict in histhoughts, betweene content and pitty. It did not a little joy andcontent him, that the revenge which he so earnestly desired tocompasse, was now by him so effectually inflicted. And yet (in meerehumanity) pitty provoked him, to commisserate the Ladies distressedcondition: but clemency being over-weake to withstand his rigor,thus he replied. Madam Helena, if mine entreaties (which, to speaketruly, I never knew how to steepe in tears, nor wrap up my words insugar Candie, so cuningly as you women know how to do) could haveprevailed, that miserable night, when I was well-neere frozen to deathwith cold, and meerly buried with snow in your Court, not havinganie place of rescue or shelter; your complaints would now the moreeasily over-rule me. But if your honor in estimation, bee now moreprecious to you then heretofore, and it seemeth so offensive tostand there naked: convert your perswasions and prayers to him, inwhose armes you were that night imbraced, both of your triumphing inmy misery, when poor I, trotted about your Court, with the teethquivering in my head, and beating mine armes about my body, finding nocompassion in him, or you. Let him bring thee thy Garments, let himcome helpe thee down with the Ladder, and let him have the care ofthine honour, on whom thou hast bene so prodigall heretofore inbestowing it, and now hast unwomanly throwne thy selfe in perill,onely for the maintenance of thine immodest desires.

  • 邵馨莲 07-31

    {  Maestro Simone, an ydle-headed Doctor of Physicke, was throwne byBruno and Buffalmaco, into a common Leystall of Filth: The Physitianfondly beleeving, that (in the night time) he should bee made one of anew created Company, who usually went to see wonders at Corsica; andthere in the Leystall they left him.

  • 李传报 07-31

      APPROVING, THAT CHASTE AND HONEST WOMEN, OUGHT RATHER TO DENY

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