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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:朱银玲 大小:C2Y2gTUz74049KB 下载:qD2jD0Rf83126次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:uh6i5rXf62767条
日期:2020-08-04 16:21:29
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  He then took off his armour and gave it to Eumaeus and Philoetius,who went straight on to the house, while he turned off into thevineyard to make trial of his father. As he went down into the greatorchard, he did not see Dolius, nor any of his sons nor of the otherbondsmen, for they were all gathering thorns to make a fence for thevineyard, at the place where the old man had told them; he thereforefound his father alone, hoeing a vine. He had on a dirty old shirt,patched and very shabby; his legs were bound round with thongs ofoxhide to save him from the brambles, and he also wore sleeves ofleather; he had a goat skin cap on his head, and was looking verywoe-begone. When Ulysses saw him so worn, so old and full of sorrow,he stood still under a tall pear tree and began to weep. He doubtedwhether to embrace him, kiss him, and tell him all about his havingcome home, or whether he should first question him and see what hewould say. In the end he deemed it best to be crafty with him, so inthis mind he went up to his father, who was bending down and diggingabout a plant.
2.  "You are asleep, Penelope: the gods who live at ease will not sufferyou to weep and be so sad. Your son has done them no wrong, so he willyet come back to you."
3.  "What do you mean, Telemachus," replied Antinous, "by thisswaggering talk? If all the suitors were to give him as much as Iwill, he would not come here again for another three months."
4.  "But the cruel wretch said, 'Then I will eat all Noman's comradesbefore Noman himself, and will keep Noman for the last. This is thepresent that I will make him.'
5.  "Sir, give me something; you are not, surely, the poorest manhere; you seem to be a chief, foremost among them all; therefore youshould be the better giver, and I will tell far and wide of yourbounty. I too was a rich man once, and had a fine house of my own;in those days I gave to many a tramp such as I now am, no matter whohe might be nor what he wanted. I had any number of servants, andall the other things which people have who live well and are accountedwealthy, but it pleased Jove to take all away from me. He sent me witha band of roving robbers to Egypt; it was a long voyage and I wasundone by it. I stationed my bade ships in the river Aegyptus, andbade my men stay by them and keep guard over them, while sent outscouts to reconnoitre from every point of vantage.
6.  "I will not refuse you," replied Telemachus, "if you wish to joinus. Come, therefore, and in Ithaca we will treat you hospitablyaccording to what we have."

计划指导

1.  "What do you think of this man, O Phaecians? Is he not tall and goodlooking, and is he not Clever? True, he is my own guest, but all ofyou share in the distinction. Do not he a hurry to send him away,nor niggardly in the presents you make to one who is in such greatneed, for heaven has blessed all of you with great abundance."
2.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Poor unhappy stranger, Ihave found the story of your misfortunes extremely interesting, butthat part about Ulysses is not right; and you will never get me tobelieve it. Why should a man like you go about telling lies in thisway? I know all about the return of my master. The gods one and all ofthem detest him, or they would have taken him before Troy, or lethim die with friends around him when the days of his fighting weredone; for then the Achaeans would have built a mound over his ashesand his son would have been heir to his renown, but now the stormwinds have spirited him away we know not whither.
3.  At this moment the bow was in the hands of Eurymachus, who waswarming it by the fire, but even so he could not string it, and he wasgreatly grieved. He heaved a deep sigh and said, "I grieve formyself and for us all; I grieve that I shall have to forgo themarriage, but I do not care nearly so much about this, for there areplenty of other women in Ithaca and elsewhere; what I feel most is thefact of our being so inferior to Ulysses in strength that we cannotstring his bow. This will disgrace us in the eyes of those who are yetunborn."
4.  "When we had passed the [Wandering] rocks, with Scylla andterrible Charybdis, we reached the noble island of the sun-god,where were the goodly cattle and sheep belonging to the sunHyperion. While still at sea in my ship I could bear the cattle lowingas they came home to the yards, and the sheep bleating. Then Iremembered what the blind Theban prophet Teiresias had told me, andhow carefully Aeaean Circe had warned me to shun the island of theblessed sun-god. So being much troubled I said to the men, 'My men,I know you are hard pressed, but listen while I tell you theprophecy that Teiresias made me, and how carefully Aeaean Circe warnedme to shun the island of the blessed sun-god, for it was here, shesaid, that our worst danger would lie. Head the ship, therefore,away from the island.'
5.  THEY reached the low lying city of Lacedaemon them where theydrove straight to the of abode Menelaus [and found him in his ownhouse, feasting with his many clansmen in honour of the wedding of hisson, and also of his daughter, whom he was marrying to the son of thatvaliant warrior Achilles. He had given his consent and promised her tohim while he was still at Troy, and now the gods were bringing themarriage about; so he was sending her with chariots and horses tothe city of the Myrmidons over whom Achilles' son was reigning. Forhis only son he had found a bride from Sparta, daughter of Alector.This son, Megapenthes, was born to him of a bondwoman, for heavenvouchsafed Helen no more children after she had borne Hermione, whowas fair as golden Venus herself.
6.  He found her at home. There was a large fire burning on thehearth, and one could smell from far the fragrant reek of burningcedar and sandal wood. As for herself, she was busy at her loom,shooting her golden shuttle through the warp and singingbeautifully. Round her cave there was a thick wood of alder, poplar,and sweet smelling cypress trees, wherein all kinds of great birds hadbuilt their nests- owls, hawks, and chattering sea-crows that occupytheir business in the waters. A vine loaded with grapes was trainedand grew luxuriantly about the mouth of the cave; there were also fourrunning rills of water in channels cut pretty close together, andturned hither and thither so as to irrigate the beds of violets andluscious herbage over which they flowed. Even a god could not helpbeing charmed with such a lovely spot, so Mercury stood still andlooked at it; but when he had admired it sufficiently he went insidethe cave.

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1.  Their hearts sank as they heard him, but Eurymachus again spokesaying:
2.  Then Ulysses in his turn melted, and wept as he clasped his dear andfaithful wife to his bosom. As the sight of land is welcome to men whoare swimming towards the shore, when Neptune has wrecked their shipwith the fury of his winds and waves- a few alone reach the land,and these, covered with brine, are thankful when they findthemselves on firm ground and out of danger- even so was her husbandwelcome to her as she looked upon him, and she could not tear hertwo fair arms from about his neck. Indeed they would have gone onindulging their sorrow till rosy-fingered morn appeared, had notMinerva determined otherwise, and held night back in the far west,while she would not suffer Dawn to leave Oceanus, nor to yoke thetwo steeds Lampus and Phaethon that bear her onward to break the dayupon mankind.
3.  "Come on each of you in his turn, going towards the right from theplace at which the. cupbearer begins when he is handing round thewine."
4.  "On this I took comfort in spite of all my sorrow, and said, 'Iknow, then, about these two; tell me, therefore, about the third manof whom you spoke; is he still alive, but at sea, and unable to gethome? or is he dead? Tell me, no matter how much it may grieve me.'
5.   "Antinous, insolent and wicked schemer, they say you are the bestspeaker and counsellor of any man your own age in Ithaca, but youare nothing of the kind. Madman, why should you try to compass thedeath of Telemachus, and take no heed of suppliants, whose witnessis Jove himself? It is not right for you to plot thus against oneanother. Do you not remember how your father fled to this house infear of the people, who were enraged against him for having gonewith some Taphian pirates and plundered the Thesprotians who were atpeace with us? They wanted to tear him in pieces and eat up everythinghe had, but Ulysses stayed their hands although they wereinfuriated, and now you devour his property without paying for it, andbreak my heart by his wooing his wife and trying to kill his son.Leave off doing so, and stop the others also."
6.  Then spoke the aged hero Echeneus who was one of the oldest menamong them, "My friends," said he, "what our august queen has justsaid to us is both reasonable and to the purpose, therefore bepersuaded by it; but the decision whether in word or deed restsultimately with King Alcinous."

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1.  "'That,' said he, 'I can soon do Any ghost that you let taste of theblood will talk with you like a reasonable being, but if you do notlet them have any blood they will go away again.'
2.  "I will say what I think will be best," answered Ulysses. "Firstwash and put your shirts on; tell the maids also to go to their ownroom and dress; Phemius shall then strike up a dance tune on his lyre,so that if people outside hear, or any of the neighbours, or someone going along the street happens to notice it, they may thinkthere is a wedding in the house, and no rumours about the death of thesuitors will get about in the town, before we can escape to thewoods upon my own land. Once there, we will settle which of thecourses heaven vouchsafes us shall seem wisest."
3.  Telemachus took this speech as of good omen and rose at once, for hewas bursting with what he had to say. He stood in the middle of theassembly and the good herald Pisenor brought him his staff. Then,turning to Aegyptius, "Sir," said he, "it is I, as you will shortlylearn, who have convened you, for it is I who am the most aggrieved. Ihave not got wind of any host approaching about which I would warnyou, nor is there any matter of public moment on which I wouldspeak. My grieveance is purely personal, and turns on two greatmisfortunes which have fallen upon my house. The first of these is theloss of my excellent father, who was chief among all you here present,and was like a father to every one of you; the second is much moreserious, and ere long will be the utter ruin of my estate. The sons ofall the chief men among you are pestering my mother to marry themagainst her will. They are afraid to go to her father Icarius,asking him to choose the one he likes best, and to provide marriagegifts for his daughter, but day by day they keep hanging about myfather's house, sacrificing our oxen, sheep, and fat goats for theirbanquets, and never giving so much as a thought to the quantity ofwine they drink. No estate can stand such recklessness; we have now noUlysses to ward off harm from our doors, and I cannot hold my ownagainst them. I shall never all my days be as good a man as he was,still I would indeed defend myself if I had power to do so, for Icannot stand such treatment any longer; my house is being disgracedand ruined. Have respect, therefore, to your own consciences and topublic opinion. Fear, too, the wrath of heaven, lest the gods shouldbe displeased and turn upon you. I pray you by Jove and Themis, who isthe beginning and the end of councils, [do not] hold back, my friends,and leave me singlehanded- unless it be that my brave father Ulyssesdid some wrong to the Achaeans which you would now avenge on me, byaiding and abetting these suitors. Moreover, if I am to be eaten outof house and home at all, I had rather you did the eatingyourselves, for I could then take action against you to somepurpose, and serve you with notices from house to house till I gotpaid in full, whereas now I have no remedy."
4、  On this the gods gathered to the house of Vulcan. Earth-encirclingNeptune came, and Mercury the bringer of luck, and King Apollo, butthe goddesses stayed at home all of them for shame. Then the givers ofall good things stood in the doorway, and the blessed gods roared withinextinguishable laughter, as they saw how cunning Vulcan had been,whereon one would turn towards his neighbour saying:
5、  "When however, we had sacked the city of Priam, and were settingsail in our ships as heaven had dispersed us, then Jove saw fit to vexthe Argives on their homeward voyage; for they had Not all been eitherwise or understanding, and hence many came to a bad end through thedispleasure of Jove's daughter Minerva, who brought about a quarrelbetween the two sons of Atreus.

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  • 贾高博 08-03

      While he was thus in two minds, Neptune sent a terrible great wavethat seemed to rear itself above his head till it broke right over theraft, which then went to pieces as though it were a heap of drychaff tossed about by a whirlwind. Ulysses got astride of one plankand rode upon it as if he were on horseback; he then took off theclothes Calypso had given him, bound Ino's veil under his arms, andplunged into the sea- meaning to swim on shore. King Neptune watchedhim as he did so, and wagged his head, muttering to himself andsaying, "'There now, swim up and down as you best can till you fall inwith well-to-do people. I do not think you will be able to say thatI have let you off too lightly." On this he lashed his horses anddrove to Aegae where his palace is.

  • 翁妪 08-03

      "Hence I was carried along for nine days till on the tenth night thegods stranded me on the Ogygian island, where dwells the great andpowerful goddess Calypso. She took me in and was kind to me, but Ineed say no more about this, for I told you and your noble wife allabout it yesterday, and I hate saying the same thing over and overagain."

  • 陈沧江 08-03

       The suitors bit their lips, and marvelled at the boldness of hisspeech; then Antinous said, "We do not like such language but wewill put up with it, for Telemachus is threatening us in good earnest.If Jove had let us we should have put a stop to his brave talk erenow."

  • 明·达吾提 08-03

      Then they roasted the outer meat, drew it off the spits, gaveevery man his portion, and feasted to their hearts' content; those whowaited at table gave Ulysses exactly the same portion as the othershad, for Telemachus had told them to do so.

  • 谭建平 08-02

    {  "Then came also the ghost of Theban Teiresias, with his goldensceptre in his hand. He knew me and said, 'Ulysses, noble son ofLaertes, why, poor man, have you left the light of day and come downto visit the dead in this sad place? Stand back from the trench andwithdraw your sword that I may drink of the blood and answer yourquestions truly.'

  • 嘉丽 08-01

      "And now, O queen, have pity upon me, for you are the first person Ihave met, and I know no one else in this country. Show me the way toyour town, and let me have anything that you may have brought hitherto wrap your clothes in. May heaven grant you in all things yourheart's desire- husband, house, and a happy, peaceful home; forthere is nothing better in this world than that man and wife should beof one mind in a house. It discomfits their enemies, makes thehearts of their friends glad, and they themselves know more about itthan any one."}

  • 严模纲 08-01

      On this the old woman went out of the room to bid the maids go totheir mistress. In the meantime Minerva bethought her of anothermatter, and sent Penelope off into a sweet slumber; so she lay down onher couch and her limbs became heavy with sleep. Then the goddess shedgrace and beauty over her that all the Achaeans might admire her.She washed her face with the ambrosial loveliness that Venus wearswhen she goes dancing with the Graces; she made her taller and of amore commanding figure, while as for her complexion it was whiter thansawn ivory. When Minerva had done all this she went away, whereonthe maids came in from the women's room and woke Penelope with thesound of their talking.

  • 肖伸 08-01

      "I spoke as movingly as I could, but they said nothing, till theirfather answered, 'Vilest of mankind, get you gone at once out of theisland; him whom heaven hates will I in no wise help. Be off, foryou come here as one abhorred of heaven. "And with these words he sentme sorrowing from his door.

  • 内森 07-31

       This made them all very angry, for they feared he might string thebow; Antinous therefore rebuked him fiercely saying, "Wretchedcreature, you have not so much as a grain of sense in your whole body;you ought to think yourself lucky in being allowed to dine unharmedamong your betters, without having any smaller portion served you thanwe others have had, and in being allowed to hear our conversation.No other beggar or stranger has been allowed to hear what we say amongourselves; the wine must have been doing you a mischief, as it doeswith all those drink immoderately. It was wine that inflamed theCentaur Eurytion when he was staying with Peirithous among theLapithae. When the wine had got into his head he went mad and didill deeds about the house of Peirithous; this angered the heroes whowere there assembled, so they rushed at him and cut off his ears andnostrils; then they dragged him through the doorway out of thehouse, so he went away crazed, and bore the burden of his crime,bereft of understanding. Henceforth, therefore, there was warbetween mankind and the centaurs, but he brought it upon himselfthrough his own drunkenness. In like manner I can tell you that itwill go hardly with you if you string the bow: you will find nomercy from any one here, for we shall at once ship you off to kingEchetus, who kills every one that comes near him: you will never getaway alive, so drink and keep quiet without getting into a quarrelwith men younger than yourself."

  • 范丽颖 07-29

    {  "Son of Atreus," replied Telemachus, "do not press me to staylonger; I should be contented to remain with you for another twelvemonths; I find your conversation so delightful that I should neveronce wish myself at home with my parents; but my crew whom I have leftat Pylos are already impatient, and you are detaining me from them. Asfor any present you may be disposed to make me, I had rather that itshould he a piece of plate. I will take no horses back with me toIthaca, but will leave them to adorn your own stables, for you havemuch flat ground in your kingdom where lotus thrives, as alsomeadowsweet and wheat and barley, and oats with their white andspreading ears; whereas in Ithaca we have neither open fields norracecourses, and the country is more fit for goats than horses, andI like it the better for that. None of our islands have much levelground, suitable for horses, and Ithaca least of all."

  • 傅德志 07-29

      "I wish it may prove so," answered Telemachus. "If it does, I willshow you so much good will and give you so many presents that allwho meet you will congratulate you."

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