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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:杨小兰 大小:RnzyEGUs70978KB 下载:SNj8o5yY47720次
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日期:2020-08-06 12:18:33
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王铁林

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  But yet Loves fire is oftentimes too fierce;
2.  As Massetto was thus about his Garden emploiment, the Nunnes beganto resort thither, and thinking the man to be dumbe and deafe indeede,were the more lavish of their language, mocking and flowting himvery immodestly, as being perswaded, that he heard them not. And theLady Abbesse, thinking he might as well be an Eunuch, as deprived bothof hearing and speaking, stood the lesse in feare of the Sisterswalkes, but referred them to their owne care and providence. On a day,Massetto having laboured somewhat extraordinarily, lay downe to resthimselfe awhile under the trees, and two delicate yong Nunnes, walkingthere to take the aire, drew neere to the place where he dissembledsleeping; and both of them observing his comelinesse of person,began to pitty the poverty of his condition; but much more themisery of his great defectes. Then one of them, who had a littlelivelier spirit then the other, thinking Massetto to be fastasleepe, began in this manner.
3.  Many notable courses whee.ed about his conceit, every onepromising fairely, and ministring meanes of formall apparance, yet one(above the rest) wonne his absolute allowance, which he intended toprosecute as best he might. In which resolution, he kept still veryclose, so long as Spinelloccio was with his Wife; but hee beinggone, he went into the Chamber, where he found his wife, amendingthe forme of her head attyre, which Spinelloccio had put into adisordred fashion. Wife (quoth be) what art thou doing? Why? Do younot see Husband? answered she. Yes that I do wife, replied Zeppa,and something else happened to my sight, which I could wish that I hadnot seene. Rougher Language growing betweene them, of his avouching,and her as stout denying, with defending her cause over-weakely,against the manifest proofes both of eye and eare: at last she fell onher knees before him, weeping incessantly, and no excuses nowavailing, she confest her long acquaintance with Spinelloccio, andmost humbly entreated him to forgive her. Uppon the which penitentconfession and submission, Zeppa thus answered.
4.  Alas sweete Belcolore answered Sir Simon, I never beare any such sumabout me, for men of our profession, doe seldome carry any money atall: but beleeve me on my word, before Saturday come, I will not faileto bring them hither. Oh Sir (quoth Belcolore) you men are quickepromisers, but slow performers. Doe you thinke to use me, as pooreBillezza was, who trusted to as faire words, and found her selfedeceived? Now Sir Simon, her example in being made scandall to theworld, is a sufficient warning for me: if you be not so provided,goe and make use of your friend, for I am not otherwise to be moved.Nay Belcolore (quoth he) I hope you will not serve me so, but myword shall be of better worth with you. Consider the conveniency oftime, wee being so privately here alone: whereas at my returninghither againe, some hinderance may thwart me, and the like opportunitybe never obtained. Sir, she) you have heard my resolution; if you willfetche the Florines, doe; otherwise, walke about your businesse, for Iam a woman of my word.
5.  But of all those rich and sumptuous Beds (if pride of mine owneopinion do not deceive me) them two provided for Buffalmaco and me,had hardly any equall: he having the Queene of France as his Ladyand Mistresse, and I, the renowned Queene of England, the onely twochoise beauties of the whole World, and wee appeared so pleasing intheir eyes, as they would have refused the greatest Monarkes on theearth, rather then to bee rejected by us. Now therefore, you mayeasily consider with your selfe, what great reason we have to livemore merrily, then any other men can doe: in regard we enjoy thegracious favour of two such Royall Queenes, receyving also from them(whensoever wee please to commaund them) a thousand or two thousandFlorines at the least, which are both truly and duly sent us. Enjoyingthus the benefit of this high happinesse, we that are companions ofthis Society, do tearme it in our vulgar Language, The Pyrats voyageto Corsica. Because, as Rovers or Pyrats robbe and take away thegoodes of such as they meete withall, even so do we: only thereremaineth this difference betweene us, that they never restore whatthey have taken: which we do immediately afterward, whether it berequired or no. And thus Master Doctor, as to my most endeered friend,I have now revealed the meaning of sayling to Corsica, after themanner of our private Pyracie, and how important the close retentionof the voiage is, you are best able your selfe to judge: In whichregarde, remember your Oathes and faithfull promises, or else I amundone for ever.
6.  Eyes, can ye not refraine your hourely weeping?

计划指导

1.  As made the paine most pleasing, gracious,
2.  Philostratus had no sooner concluded his Novell, and the wholeAssembly laughed Madame thereat: but the Queen gave command toMadame Philomena, that shee should follow next in order; whereuponthus shee began. Worthy Ladies, as Philostratus, by calling to memoriethe name of Maso del Saggio, hath contented you with another merryNovell concerning him: In the same manner must I intreat you, toremember once againe Calandrino and his subtle by a pretty talewhich I meane to tell ow, and in what manner they were revenged onhim, for going to seeke the invisible Stone.
3.  Every one in this honest and gracious assembly, most highlycommended the Novell re-counted by the Queene: but especially Dioneus,who remained to finish that dayes pleasure with his owne Discourse,and after many praises of the former tale were past, thus he began.Faire Ladies, part of the Queenes Novell hath made an alteration of myminde, from that which I intended to proceede next withall, andtherfore I will report another. I cannot forget the unmanlyindiscretion of Bernardo, but much more the base arrogance ofAmbroginolo, how justly deserved shame fell upon him, as well it mayhappen to all other, that are so vile in their owne opinions, as heapparantly approved himselfe to be. For, as men wander abroad in theworld, according to their occasions in diversity of Countries andobservations of the peoples behaviour; so are their humours asvariously transported. And if they finde women wantonly disposedabroade, the like judgement they give of their Wives at home; as ifthey had never knowne their birth and breeding, or made proofe oftheir loyall carriage towards them. Wherefore, the Tale that I purposeto relate, will likewise condemne all the like kind of men, but moreespecially such as thinke themselves endued with more strength thenNature meant to bestow on them, foolishly beleeving, that they cancover their owne defects by fabulous demonstrations, and thinking tofashion other of their owne complexions, that are meerely strangers tosuch grosse follies.Know then, that there lived in Pisa (some hundred yeeres beforeTuscany and Liguria embraced the Christian faith) a judge betterstored with wisedome and ingenuity, then corporall abilities of thebody, named Signior Ricciardo di Cinzica. He being more then halfeperswaded, that hee could content a woman with such satisfaction ashee daily bestowed on his studies, being a widdower, and extraordinarywealthy, laboured with no meane paines, to enjoy a faire and youthfullwife in marriage: both which qualities hee should much rather haveavoyded, if he could have ministred as good counsell to himselfe, ashe did to others, resorting to him for advice. Upon this his amorousand diligent inquisition, it came so to passe, that a worthyGentlewoman, called Bertolomea, one of the fairest and choisest yongmaids in Pisa, whose youth did hardly agree with his age; but muck wasthe motive of this mariage, and no expectation of mutuall contentment.The Judge being married, and the Bride brought solemnly home to hishouse, we need make no question of brave cheare and banquetting,well furnished by their friends on either side: other matters were nowhammering in the judges head, for thogh he could please all hisClients with counsel, yet now such a suit was commenced againsthimselfe, and in Beauties Court of continuall requests, that the Judgefailing in plea for his own defence, was often nonsuited by lack ofanswer; yet he wanted not good wines, drugs, and all sorts ofrestoratives to comfort the heart, and encrease good blood: but allavailed not.
4.  Imprisonment had somwhat mishapen Jehannot in his outward forme, butnot impaired a jot of his noble spirit; much lesse the true love whichhe bare his friend. And although most earnestly he desired thatwhich now Conrado had so frankly offered him, and was in his poweronely to bestow on him; yet could he not cloud any part of hisgreatnes, but with a resolved judgement, thus replied. My Lord,affectation of rule, desire of welthy possessions, or any other matterwhatsoever could never make me a traitor to you or yours; but that Ihave loved, do love, and for ever shal love your beauteous daughter:if that be treason, I do free confesse it, and will die a thousanddeaths before you or any else shall enforce me to deny it, for Ihold her highly worthy of my love. If I have bin more unmannerlywith her then became me, I have committed but that error, whichevermore is so attendant uppon youth; that to deny, is to denieyouth also. And if reverend age would but remember, that once he wasyoung and measure others offences by his owne, they would not bethoght so great, as you (and many more) account them to be, mine beingcommitted as a friend, and not as an enemy. What you make offer ofso willingly, I have alwayes desired; and if I had thought it wouldhave beene granted, long since I had most humbly requested it: andso much the more acceptable would it have bin to me, by how much thefurther off it stood from my hopes. But if you bee so forward asyour words doe witnesse, then feed me not with any furtherfruitlesse expectation; but rather send me backe to prison, and lay asmany afflictions on me as you please. For my endeered love to yourdaughter Spina, maketh mee to love you the more for her sake, howhardly soever you intreat me; and bindeth me in the greaterreverence to you, as being the Father of my fairest friend.
5.  On the morrow, after dinner, arming himselfe, and two more of hisservants with him, such as he had solemnly sworne to secrecy, hemounted on horsebacke, and rode on about a mile from his owneCastle, where he lay closely ambushed in a Wood, through whichGuardastagno must needs passe. After he had stayed there some twohoures space and more, he espyed him come riding with two of hisattendants, all of them being unarmed, as no way distrusting anysuch intended treason. So soone as he was come to the place, wherehe had resolved to do the deed; hee rushed forth of the ambush, andhaving a sharpe Lance readily charged in his rest, ran mainly athim, saying: False villaine, thou art dead. Guardastagno, havingnothing wherewith to defend himselfe, nor his servants able to givehim any succour; being pierced quite through the body with theLance, downe he fell dead to the ground, and his men (fearing the likemisfortune to befall them) gallopped mainely backe againe to theirLords Castle, not knowing them who had thus murthered their Master, byreason of their armed disguises, which in those martiall times wereusually worne.
6.  GREAT LORDS, ARE MANY TIMES RECOMPENCED, RATHER BY THEIR GOOD

推荐功能

1.  The Lord Abbot recreated himselfe a while with his owne people, towhom he recounted, the course of his life since hee saw them; and theylikewise told him, how kindly they had bin initeated by Ghinotto.But when dinner time was come, the Lord Abbot and all his company,were served with costly viands and excellent Wines, without Ghinottoesmaking himselfe knowne to the Abbot: till after he had beeneentertained some few dayes in this order: into the great Hall of theCastle, Ghinotto caused all the Abbots goods and furniture to beebrought, and likewise into a spacious Court, wheron the windowes ofthe said Court gazed, all his mules and horses, with their sumpters,even to the very silliest of them, which being done, Ghinotto wentto the Abbot, and demaunded of him, how he felt his stomacke now,and whether it would serve him to venter on horsebacke as yet, orno? The Lord Abbot answered, that he found his stomacke perfectlyrecovered, his body strong enough to endure travell, and all thingswell, so hee were delivered from Ghinotto.
2.  When all the people were assembled in the Church together, FriarOnyon (never distrusting any injurie offered him, or that his closecommodities had bin medled withal) began his predication, uttering athousand lies to fit his purpose. And when he came to shew the featherof the Phoenix (having first in great devotion finisht the confession)he caused two goodly torches to be lighted, and ducking downe his headthree severall times, before hee would so much as touch the Taffata,he opened it with much reverence. So soone as the Cabinet came to beseen, off went his Hood, lowly he bowed downe his body, and utteringespecial praises of the Phoenix, and sacred properties of thewonderfull Relique, the Cover of the Cabinet being lifted uppe, he sawthe same to bee full of Coales. He could not suspect his Villaineboy to do this deede, for he knew him not to be endued with so muchwit, onely hee curst him for keeping it no better, and cursthimselfe also, for reposing trust in such a careles knave, knowing himto be slothfull, disobedient, negligent, and void of all honestunderstanding or grace. Sodainly (without blushing) lest his losseshould be discerned, he lifted his lookes and hands to heaven,speaking out so loude, as every one might easily heare him, thus: Othou omnipotent providence, for ever let thy power be praised. Thenmaking fast the Cabinet againe, and turning himselfe to the people,with lookes expressing admiration, he proceeded in this manner.
3.  Sir Roger Mandevile, hearing first what the Count had saide, andseeing what Perotto afterward performed; became surprized with suchextraordinary joy and admiration, that he knew not how to carryhimselfe in this case. Neverthelesse, giving credite to his words, andbeing somewhat ashamed, that he had not used the Count in morerespective manner, and remembring beside, the unkinde language ofhis furious Father to him: he kneeled downe, humbly craving pardon,both for his Fathers rudenes and his owne, which was courteouslygranted by the Count, embracing him lovingly in his armes.
4.  Was onely borne to feede me with despaires,
5.   When he had ended these words, hee turned to Lisana, saying: Heeredoe I freely give over all further fruits of your affection towardsme, thanking you for your former love: so taking her head betweene hishands he kissed her faire forhead, which was the usuall custome inthose times. Perdicano, the Father and Mother of Lisana, and she herselfe likewise, extraordinarily joyfull for this so fortunate amarriage, returned humble and hearty thankes both to the King andQueene, and (as many credible Authors doe affirme) the King kept hispromise made to Lisana, because (so long as he lived) he alwalestermed himselfe by the name of her Knight, and in al actions ofChivalry by him undertaken, he never carried any other devise, butsuch as he received still from her.
6.  But, to compaise more familiar acquaintance with Belcolore, hee senther sundry gifts and presents, day by day, as sometime a bunch ofdainty greene Garlicke, whereof he had plenty growing in his Garden,which he manured with his owne hands, and better then all the countreyyeelded; otherwhiles a small basket of Pease or Benes, and Onyons orScallions, as the season served. But when he could come in place whereshe was; then he darted amourous wincks and glances at her, withbecks, nods, and blushes, Loves private Ambassadours, which shee(being but countrey-bred) seeming by outward appearance, not to see,retorted disdainefully, and forthwith would absent her selfe, sothat sweet Sir Simon laboured still in vaine, and could not compassewhat he coveted.

应用

1.  Worthy Gentlemen, this Lady is that true and faithfull servant,wherof I moved the question to you, whom I tooke out of the coldstreet, where her parents, kindred and friends (making no account atall of her) threw her forth, as a thing vile and unprofitable.Neverthelesse, such hath been my care and cost, that I have rescuedher out of deaths griping power; and, in a meere charitabledisposition, which honest affection caused me to beare her; of a body,full of terror and affrighting (as then she was) I have caused herto become thus lovely as you see. But because you may moreapparantly discerne, in what manner this occasion happened; I will layit open to you in more familiar manner. Then he began the wholehistory, from the originall of his unbeseeming affection to her (inregard she was a worthy mans wife) and consequently, how all hadhappened to the instant houre, to the no meane admiration of all thehearers, adding withall. Now Gentlemen (quoth he) if you varry notfrom your former opinion, and especially Signior NicoluccioCaccianimico: this Lady (by good right) is mine, and no man els by anyjust title, can lay any claime to her.
2.  To cleare which doubt, and for my further assurance of her wellmeanning toward me; if she wil undertake the performance of three suchthings as I must needes require in this case: I am afterward her owne,in any service she can command me. The first of them, is; that inthe presence of my Lord and Master, she kill his faire Faulcon,which so dearly hee affecteth. The second, to send me a locke ortuft of his beard, being puld away with her owne hand. The third andlast, with the same hand also, to pluck out one of his best andsoundest teeth, and send it mee as her loves true token. When Ifinde all these three effectually performed, I am wholly hers, and notbefore.
3.  Much discontented was the Lady at this unexpected accident, andnot knowing now how to spend the time, resolved to use the Bathwhich shee had made for the Marquesse, and (after supper) betake herselfe to rest, and so she entred into the Bath. Close to the doorewhere poore Rinaldo sate, stoode the Bath, by which meanes, shee beingtherein, heard all his quivering moanes, and complaints, seeming to besuch, as the Swanne singing before her death: whereupon, shee calledher Chamber-maide, saying to her. Goe up above, and looke over theterrace on the wall downe to this doore, and see who is there, andwhat he doth. The Chamber-maide went up aloft, and by a littleglimmering in the ayre, she saw a man sitting in his shirt, bare onfeete and legges, trembling in manner before rehearsed. Shedemanding of whence, and what he was; Rinaldoes teeth so trembled inhis head, as very hardly could he forme any words, but (so well ashe could) told her what he was, and how he came thither: mostpittifully entreating her, that if she could affoord him any helpe,not to suffer him to starve there to death with cold.
4、  WELL ADVISED, AND CAREFULLY TO KEEPE HIMSELFE FROM THE
5、  Poore soule, why live I then?

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网友评论(EQIzEjaW58137))

  • 金宝 08-05

      My Lord Abbot looking demurely on the Maide, and perceiving her tobe faire, feate, and lovely; felt immediately (although he was olde)no lesse spurring on to fleshly desires, then the young Monke beforehad done; whereupon he beganne to conferre thus privately withhimselfe. Why should I not take pleasure, when I may freely have it?Cares and molestations I endure every day, but sildome find suchdelights prepared for me. This is a delicate sweete young Damosell,and here is no eye that can discover me. If I can enduce her to doe asI would have her, I know no reason why I should gaine-say it. No mancan know it, or any tongue blaze it abroade; and sinne so concealed,is halfe pardoned. Such a faire fortune as this is, perhapshereafter will never befall me; and therefore I hold it wisedome, totake such a benefit when a man may enjoy it.

  • 陈琪 08-05

      To cheare my long dismay:

  • 张剑平 08-05

       Wondrously pleasing to all the company, was the reported Novell ofMadame Fiammetta, every one applauding the Womans wisedome, and thatshe had done no more, then as the jealous foole her husband justlydeserved. But shee having ended, the King gave order unto MadamePampinea, that now it was her turne to speake, whereupon, thus shebegan. There are no meane store of people who say (though very falseand foolishly,) that Love maketh many to be out of their wits, andthat such as fall in Love, do utterly loose their understanding. Tomee this appeareth a very ydle opinion, as already hath beene approvedby the related discourses, and shall also bee made manifest by anotherof mine owne.

  • 广田弘毅 08-05

      Then calling for the glasse of water, which she had readily preparedthe day before, and powring it upon the heart lying in the Cup,couragiously advancing it to her mouth, she dranke it up every drop;which being done, she lay downe upon her bed, holding her Lovers heartfast in her hand, and laying it so neere to her owne as she could. Nowalthough her women knew not what water it was, yet when they had seeneher to quaffe it off in that manner, they sent word to the King, whomuch suspecting what had happened, went in all haste to hisDaughters Chamber, entring at the very instant, when she was laideupon her bed; beholding her in such passionate pangs, with tearesstreaming downe his reverend beard, he used many kinde words tocomfort her: when boldly thus she spake unto him. Father (quoth she)well may you spare these teares, because they are unfitting for you,and not any way desired by me; who but your selfe, hath seene anyman to mourne for his owne wilfull offence. Neverthelesse, if butthe least jot of that love do yet abide in you, whereof you havemade such liberall profession to me; let me obtaine this my verylast request, to wit, that seeing I might not privately enjoy thebenefit of Guiscardoes love, and while he lived, let yet (in death)one publike grave containe both our bodies, that death may affoord us,what you so cruelly in life denied us.

  • 林淑如 08-04

    {  So soone as Madam Lauretta held her peace, Madam Pampinea (by theQueenes command) began, and said. Lovely Ladies, as pitty is mosthighly commended in our sexe, even so is cruelty in us as severelyrevenged (oftentimes) by divine ordination. Which that you may thebetter know, and learne likewise to shun, as a deadly evill; I purposeto make apparant by a Novell, no lesse full of compassion, thendelectable.

  • 戴立为 08-03

      Rinaldo remaining there in his shirt, bare-foot and bare-legged,the weather extremely colde, and snowing incessantly, not knowing whatto doe, darke night drawing on, and looking round about him, forsome place where to abide that night, to the end he might not dye withcolde: he found no helpe at all there for him, in regard that (no longwhile before) the late warre had burnt and wasted all, and not so muchas the least Cottage left. Compelled by the coldes violence, his teethquaking, and all his body trembling, hee trotted on towardsChausteau Guillaume, not knowing, whether his man was gone thitheror no, or to what place else: but perswaded himselfe, that if he couldget entrance, there was no feare of finding succour. But before hecame within halfe a mile of the Towne, the night grew extreamelydarke, and arriving there so late, hee found the gates fast lockt, andthe Bridges drawne up, so that no entrance might be admitted.}

  • 郭谦 08-03

      THE SIXT DAY, THE SEVENTH NOVELL

  • 侯少卿 08-03

      HUSBANDES, EITHER IN RESPECT OF THEIR LOVE, OR FOR THE PREVENTION

  • 林明芳 08-02

       Not long since, there lived in the City of Trevers, an Almaine orGermaine, named Arriguo, who being a poore man, served as a Porter, orburden-bearer for money, when any man pleased to employ him. Andyet, notwithstanding his poore and meane condition, he was generallyreputed, to be of good and sanctified life. In which regard (whetherit were true or no, I know not) it happened, that when he died (atleast as the men of Trevers themselves affirmed) in the very instanthoure of his departing, all the Belles in the great Church of Trevers,(not being pulled by the helpe of any hand) beganne to ring: whichbeing accounted for a miracle, every one saide; that this Arriguohad bene, and was a Saint. And presently all the people of the Cityran to the house where the dead body lay, and carried it (as asanctified body) into the great Church, where people, halt, lame,and blind, or troubled with any other diseases, were brought about it,even as if every one should forth-with be holpen, onely by theirtouching the body.

  • 汪师傅 07-31

    {  Which new vaine hopes have bred, wherein I finde;

  • 关涛 07-31

      Let passe the wanton follies passing betweene them, and come toMadame Catulla, who finding it a fit and convenient time, to ventforth the tempest of her spleene, began in this manner. Alas! howmighty, are the misfortunes of women, and how ill requited is allthe loyall love of many wives to their husbands? I, a pooremiserable Lady, who, for the space of eight yeeres now fullycompleated, have loved thee: more dearely then mine owne life, findenow (to my hearts endlesse griefe) how thou wastest and consumestthy desires, to delight them with a strange woman, like a most vileand wicked man as thou art. With whom doest thou now imagine thy selfeto be? Thou art with her, whom thou hast long time deluded by falseblandishments, feigning to affect her, when thou doatest in thydesires else-where. I am thine owne Catulla, and not the wife ofRicciardo, trayterous and unfaithfull man, as thou art. I am sure thouknowest my voyce, and I thinke it a thousand yeeres, until wee may seeeach other in the light, to doe thee such dishonour as thou justlydeservest, dogged, disdainfull, and villainous wretch. By conceivingto have another woman in thy wanton embraces thou hast declared morejoviall disposition, and demonstrations of farre greater kindnesse,then domesticke familiarity. At home thou lookest sower, sullen orsurly, often froward, and seldome well pleased. But the best is,whereas thou intendest this husbandrie for another mans ground, thouhast (against thy will) bestowed it on thine owne, and the waterhath runne a contrary course, quite from the current where thoumeantst it.

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