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万博体育为何进不去了 注册最新版下载

万博体育为何进不去了 注册

万博体育为何进不去了注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:孙凤桐 大小:ah4ViXtF96970KB 下载:frIQLewT94758次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:y8Li5BfN52109条
日期:2020-08-07 04:21:19
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田心义

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Father Jove," said she, "and all you other gods that live ineverlasting bliss, I hope there may never be such a thing as a kindand well-disposed ruler any more, nor one who will govern equitably. Ihope they will be all henceforth cruel and unjust, for there is notone of his subjects but has forgotten Ulysses, who ruled them asthough he were their father. There he is, lying in great pain in anisland where dwells the nymph Calypso, who will not let him go; and hecannot get back to his own country, for he can find neither shipsnor sailors to take him over the sea. Furthermore, wicked people arenow trying to murder his only son Telemachus, who is coming homefrom Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to see if he can get newsof his father."
2.  Eurymachus son of Polybus then said, "Go home, old man, and prophesyto your own children, or it may be worse for them. I can read theseomens myself much better than you can; birds are always flying aboutin the sunshine somewhere or other, but they seldom mean anything.Ulysses has died in a far country, and it is a pity you are not deadalong with him, instead of prating here about omens and adding fuel tothe anger of Telemachus which is fierce enough as it is. I suppose youthink he will give you something for your family, but I tell you-and it shall surely be- when an old man like you, who should knowbetter, talks a young one over till he becomes troublesome, in thefirst place his young friend will only fare so much the worse- he willtake nothing by it, for the suitors will prevent this- and in thenext, we will lay a heavier fine, sir, upon yourself than you willat all like paying, for it will bear hardly upon you. As forTelemachus, I warn him in the presence of you all to send his motherback to her father, who will find her a husband and provide her withall the marriage gifts so dear a daughter may expect. Till we shall goon harassing him with our suit; for we fear no man, and care neitherfor him, with all his fine speeches, nor for any fortune-telling ofyours. You may preach as much as you please, but we shall only hateyou the more. We shall go back and continue to eat up Telemachus'sestate without paying him, till such time as his mother leaves offtormenting us by keeping us day after day on the tiptoe ofexpectation, each vying with the other in his suit for a prize of suchrare perfection. Besides we cannot go after the other women whom weshould marry in due course, but for the way in which she treats us."
3.  "On this he lifted up his hands to the firmament of heaven andprayed, saying, 'Hear me, great Neptune; if I am indeed your owntrue-begotten son, grant that Ulysses may never reach his homealive; or if he must get back to his friends at last, let him do solate and in sore plight after losing all his men [let him reach hishome in another man's ship and find trouble in his house.']
4.  "Go to the house, and kill the best pig that you can find fordinner. Meanwhile I want to see whether my father will know me, orfail to recognize me after so long an absence."
5.  Thus he chided with his heart, and checked it into endurance, but hetossed about as one who turns a paunch full of blood and fat infront of a hot fire, doing it first on one side and then on the other,that he may get it cooked as soon as possible, even so did he turnhimself about from side to side, thinking all the time how, singlehanded as he was, he should contrive to kill so large a body of men asthe wicked suitors. But by and by Minerva came down from heaven in thelikeness of a woman, and hovered over his head saying, "My poorunhappy man, why do you lie awake in this way? This is your house:your wife is safe inside it, and so is your son who is just such ayoung man as any father may be proud of."
6.  "And now for yourself- stay here some ten or twelve days longer, andI will then speed you on your way. I will make you a noble presentof a chariot and three horses. I will also give you a beautifulchalice that so long as you live you may think of me whenever you makea drink-offering to the immortal gods."

计划指导

1.  Meanwhile the suitors were throwing discs or aiming with spears at amark on the levelled ground in front of Ulysses' house, and werebehaving with all their old insolence. Antinous and Eurymachus, whowere their ringleaders and much the foremost among them all, weresitting together when Noemon son of Phronius came up and said toAntinous,
2.  When Ulysses and Penelope had had their fill of love they felltalking with one another. She told him how much she had had to bear inseeing the house filled with a crowd of wicked suitors who hadkilled so many sheep and oxen on her account, and had drunk so manycasks of wine. Ulysses in his turn told her what he had suffered,and how much trouble he had himself given to other people. He told hereverything, and she was so delighted to listen that she never wentto sleep till he had ended his whole story.
3.  The suitors bit their lips as they heard him, and marvelled at theboldness of his speech. Then, Antinous, son of Eupeithes, said, "Thegods seem to have given you lessons in bluster and tall talking; mayJove never grant you to be chief in Ithaca as your father was beforeyou."
4.  "Madam, wife of Ulysses, Telemachus does not understand thesethings; listen therefore to me, for I can divine them surely, and willhide nothing from you. May Jove the king of heaven be my witness,and the rites of hospitality, with that hearth of Ulysses to which Inow come, that Ulysses himself is even now in Ithaca, and, eithergoing about the country or staying in one place, is enquiring into allthese evil deeds and preparing a day of reckoning for the suitors. Isaw an omen when I was on the ship which meant this, and I toldTelemachus about it."
5.  As he spoke he placed the sword in the hands of Ulysses and said,"Good luck to you, father stranger; if anything has been said amissmay the winds blow it away with them, and may heaven grant you asafe return, for I understand you have been long away from home, andhave gone through much hardship."
6.  Then he threw his dirty old wallet, all tattered and torn, overhis shoulder with the cord by which it hung, and went back to sit downupon the threshold; but the suitors went within the cloisters,laughing and saluting him, "May Jove, and all the other gods," saidthey, 'grant you whatever you want for having put an end to theimportunity of this insatiable tramp. We will take him over to themainland presently, to king Echetus, who kills every one that comesnear him."

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1.  And Jove answered, "What, O Lord of the Earthquake, are youtalking about? The gods are by no means wanting in respect for you. Itwould be monstrous were they to insult one so old and honoured asyou are. As regards mortals, however, if any of them is indulging ininsolence and treating you disrespectfully, it will always rest withyourself to deal with him as you may think proper, so do just as youplease."
2.  When earth-encircling Neptune heard this he went to Scheria wherethe Phaecians live, and stayed there till the ship, which was makingrapid way, had got close-in. Then he went up to it, turned it intostone, and drove it down with the flat of his hand so as to root it inthe ground. After this he went away.
3.  "I spoke comfortingly to them and said, 'We must draw our ship on tothe land, and hide the ship's gear with all our property in some cave;then come with me all of you as fast as you can to Circe's house,where you will find your comrades eating and drinking in the midstof great abundance.'
4.  "We will be sure, sir," answered Telemachus, "to tell him everythingas soon as we see him. I wish I were as certain of finding Ulyssesreturned when I get back to Ithaca, that I might tell him of thevery great kindness you have shown me and of the many beautifulpresents I am taking with me."
5.   "We do not know, Piraeus," answered Telemachus, "what may happen. Ifthe suitors kill me in my own house and divide my property among them,I would rather you had the presents than that any of those peopleshould get hold of them. If on the other hand I manage to kill them, Ishall be much obliged if you will kindly bring me my presents."
6.  This was how they talked. But Telemachus went down into the loftyand spacious store-room where his father's treasure of gold and bronzelay heaped up upon the floor, and where the linen and spare clotheswere kept in open chests. Here, too, there was a store of fragrantolive oil, while casks of old, well-ripened wine, unblended and fitfor a god to drink, were ranged against the wall in case Ulyssesshould come home again after all. The room was closed with well-madedoors opening in the middle; moreover the faithful old house-keeperEuryclea, daughter of Ops the son of Pisenor, was in charge ofeverything both night and day. Telemachus called her to the store-roomand said:

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1.  She then went quickly on, and Telemachus followed in her stepstill they reached the place where the guilds of the Pylian people wereassembled. There they found Nestor sitting with his sons, while hiscompany round him were busy getting dinner ready, and putting piecesof meat on to the spits while other pieces were cooking. When they sawthe strangers they crowded round them, took them by the hand andbade them take their places. Nestor's son Pisistratus at onceoffered his hand to each of them, and seated them on some softsheepskins that were lying on the sands near his father and hisbrother Thrasymedes. Then he gave them their portions of the inwardmeats and poured wine for them into a golden cup, handing it toMinerva first, and saluting her at the same time.
2.  The Phaeacians then began talking among themselves, and one wouldturn towards his neighbour, saying, "Bless my heart, who is it thatcan have rooted the ship in the sea just as she was getting into port?We could see the whole of her only moment ago."
3.  Euryclea did as she was told, and bolted the women inside theirroom. Then Ulysses and his son made all haste to take the helmets,shields, and spears inside; and Minerva went before them with a goldlamp in her hand that shed a soft and brilliant radiance, whereonTelemachus said, "Father, my eyes behold a great marvel: the walls,with the rafters, crossbeams, and the supports on which they restare all aglow as with a flaming fire. Surely there is some god herewho has come down from heaven."
4、  "And a pretty figure I should cut then," replied Eumaeus, both nowand hereafter, if I were to kill you after receiving you into my hutand showing you hospitality. I should have to say my prayers in goodearnest if I did; but it is just supper time and I hope my men willcome in directly, that we may cook something savoury for supper."
5、  Thus spoke the daughter of Jove, and they obeyed her saying. Menservants poured water over the hands of the guests, while pages filledthe mixing-bowls with wine and water, and handed it round after givingevery man his drink-offering; then they threw the tongues of thevictims into the fire, and stood up to make their drink-offerings.When they had made their offerings and had drunk each as much as hewas minded, Minerva and Telemachus were forgoing on board theirship, but Nestor caught them up at once and stayed them.

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网友评论(WfiIQSc374430))

  • 宋慰祖 08-06

      "At any other time," replied Telemachus, "I should have bidden yougo to my own house, for you would find no want of hospitality; atthe present moment, however, you would not be comfortable there, for Ishall be away, and my mother will not see you; she does not often showherself even to the suitors, but sits at her loom weaving in anupper chamber, out of their way; but I can tell you a man whosehouse you can go to- I mean Eurymachus the son of Polybus, who is heldin the highest estimation by every one in Ithaca. He is much thebest man and the most persistent wooer, of all those who are payingcourt to my mother and trying to take Ulysses' place. Jove, however,in heaven alone knows whether or no they will come to a bad end beforethe marriage takes place."

  • 袁慧君 08-06

      "Eurymachus," answered Ulysses, "if you and I were to work oneagainst the other in early summer when the days are at theirlongest- give me a good scythe, and take another yourself, and letus see which will fast the longer or mow the stronger, from dawntill dark when the mowing grass is about. Or if you will ploughagainst me, let us each take a yoke of tawny oxen, well-mated and ofgreat strength and endurance: turn me into a four acre field, andsee whether you or I can drive the straighter furrow. If, again, warwere to break out this day, give me a shield, a couple of spears and ahelmet fitting well upon my temples- you would find me foremost in thefray, and would cease your gibes about my belly. You are insolentand cruel, and think yourself a great man because you live in a littleworld, ind that a bad one. If Ulysses comes to his own again, thedoors of his house are wide, but you will find them narrow when youtry to fly through them."

  • 张煜文 08-06

       Ulysses frowned on him and said, "My friend, I do you no manner ofharm; people give you a great deal, but I am not jealous. There isroom enough in this doorway for the pair of us, and you need notgrudge me things that are not yours to give. You seem to be justsuch another tramp as myself, but perhaps the gods will give us betterluck by and by. Do not, however, talk too much about fighting or youwill incense me, and old though I am, I shall cover your mouth andchest with blood. I shall have more peace to-morrow if I do, for youwill not come to the house of Ulysses any more."

  • 玛里曼 08-06

      Thus he spoke, and Mercury, guide and guardian, slayer of Argus, didas he was told. Forthwith he bound on his glittering golden sandalswith which he could fly like the wind over land and sea. He took thewand with which he seals men's eyes in sleep or wakes them just ashe pleases, and flew holding it in his hand over Pieria; then heswooped down through the firmament till he reached the level of thesea, whose waves he skimmed like a cormorant that flies fishingevery hole and corner of the ocean, and drenching its thick plumage inthe spray. He flew and flew over many a weary wave, but when at lasthe got to the island which was his journey's end, he left the seaand went on by land till he came to the cave where the nymph Calypsolived.

  • 亨利·里基茨 08-05

    {  "Vixen," replied Ulysses, scowling at her, "I will go and tellTelemachus what you have been saying, and he will have you torn limbfrom limb."

  • 白云亭 08-04

      As he spoke he made a sign with his eyebrows, and Telemachusgirded on his sword, grasped his spear, and stood armed beside hisfather's seat.}

  • 闫军 08-04

      "As he spoke he dived under the waves, whereon I turned back tothe ships with my companions, and my heart was clouded with care asI went along. When we reached the ships we got supper ready, for nightwas falling, and camped down upon the beach. When the child ofmorning, rosy-fingered Dawn appeared, we drew our ships into thewater, and put our masts and sails within them; then we went onboard ourselves, took our seats on the benches, and smote the grey seawith our oars. I again stationed my ships in the heaven-fed streamof Egypt, and offered hecatombs that were full and sufficient. WhenI had thus appeased heaven's anger, I raised a barrow to the memory ofAgamemnon that his name might live for ever, after which I had a quickpassage home, for the gods sent me a fair wind.

  • 杨向峰 08-04

      Then turning to Antinous he said, "Antinous, you take as much careof my interests as though I were your son. Why should you want tosee this stranger turned out of the house? Heaven forbid; take'something and give it him yourself; I do not grudge it; I bid you takeit. Never mind my mother, nor any of the other servants in thehouse; but I know you will not do what I say, for you are more fond ofeating things yourself than of giving them to other people."

  • 陆欢 08-03

       To this Ulysses answered, "Amphinomus, you seem to be a man ofgood understanding, as indeed you may well be, seeing whose son youare. I have heard your father well spoken of; he is Nisus ofDulichium, a man both brave and wealthy. They tell me you are his son,and you appear to be a considerable person; listen, therefore, andtake heed to what I am saying. Man is the vainest of all creaturesthat have their being upon earth. As long as heaven vouchsafes himhealth and strength, he thinks that he shall come to no harmhereafter, and even when the blessed gods bring sorrow upon him, hebears it as he needs must, and makes the best of it; for GodAlmighty gives men their daily minds day by day. I know all aboutit, for I was a rich man once, and did much wrong in thestubbornness of my pride, and in the confidence that my father andmy brothers would support me; therefore let a man fear God in allthings always, and take the good that heaven may see fit to send himwithout vainglory. Consider the infamy of what these suitors aredoing; see how they are wasting the estate, and doing dishonour to thewife, of one who is certain to return some day, and that, too, notlong hence. Nay, he will be here soon; may heaven send you homequietly first that you may not meet with him in the day of his coming,for once he is here the suitors and he will not part bloodlessly."

  • 范佩西 08-01

    {  The minstrel Phemius son of Terpes- he who had been forced by thesuitors to sing to them- now tried to save his life. He was standingnear towards the trap door, and held his lyre in his hand. He didnot know whether to fly out of the cloister and sit down by thealtar of Jove that was in the outer court, and on which both Laertesand Ulysses had offered up the thigh bones of many an ox, or whetherto go straight up to Ulysses and embrace his knees, but in the endhe deemed it best to embrace Ulysses' knees. So he laid his lyre onthe ground the ground between the mixing-bowl and the silver-studdedseat; then going up to Ulysses he caught hold of his knees and said,"Ulysses, I beseech you have mercy on me and spare me. You will besorry for it afterwards if you kill a bard who can sing both forgods and men as I can. I make all my lays myself, and heaven visits mewith every kind of inspiration. I would sing to you as though you werea god, do not therefore be in such a hurry to cut my head off. Yourown son Telemachus will tell you that I did not want to frequentyour house and sing to the suitors after their meals, but they weretoo many and too strong for me, so they made me."

  • 陈武现 08-01

      "Here we entered, but so dark was the night that some god musthave brought us in, for there was nothing whatever to be seen. A thickmist hung all round our ships; the moon was hidden behind a mass ofclouds so that no one could have seen the island if he had lookedfor it, nor were there any breakers to tell us we were close inshore before we found ourselves upon the land itself; when, however,we had beached the ships, we took down the sails, went ashore andcamped upon the beach till daybreak.

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